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THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

VOL. II. 



NEW LIBRARY HOVELS. 

UNDER SEALED ORDERS. By Grant Allen. 3 vols. 
A LONDON LEGEND. By Justin H. McCarthy. 3 vols. 
THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS. By Alan St. Aubvn. 2 vols. 
BEYOND THE DREAMS OF AVARICE. By Walter 

Bksan r. I vol. 
THE MINOR CHORD. By J. Mitchell Chapple. i vol. 
HIS VANISHED STAR. By C. Egbert Craddock. i vol. 
ROMANCES OF THE OLD SERAGLIO. By H. N. Crellin. 

I vol. 
VILLAGE TALES AND JUNGLE TRAGEDIES. By B. M. 

Ckokek. I vol. 
MADAME SANS-GENE. By E. Lepei.letier. i vol. 
MOUNT DESPAIR. By D. Christie Murray, i vol. 
THE PHANTOM DEATH. By W. Clark Russell, i vol. 
THE PRINCE OF BALKIS TAN. By Allen Upward, i vol. 
London : CHATTO & WINDUS, Piccadilly. 



THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 



ALAN ST. AUBYN 

AUTHOR OF 

A FELLOW OF TRINITY,' ' THE JUNIOR DEAX,' ' THE OLD MAID'i 

SWFETHEAKT,' ETC. 




IN TWO VOLUMES 
VOL. IL 



U n D II 
CHATTO & WINDUS, PICCADILLY 

1895 



?i3 



CONTENTS OF VOL. II. 

CHAI'TER PAUii 

XIV. DORA'S DISAPPOINTMENT - - - 1 

XV. EDITH DARCY'S WEDDING-DAY - - 12 

XVI. HE KNEW HE WAS RIGHT - - - 30 

XVII. AT THE POLICE-COURT - - - 44 

XVIII. DORA RUNS AWAY - - - - 57 

XIX. TO SAVE A SCANDAL - - - - 79 

XX. CASTLE HILL - - - - 99 

XXI. TREMLETT I'. STANHOPE - - - 116 

XXII. ON BAIL - ... - 132 

XXIII. ' MY HUSBAND I' - - - - 118 

XXIV. ' MY grandfather's MINIATURE ' - - 156 
XXV. FREE !----. 174 

XXVI. ' KNOCK IT DOWN !' - - - - 188 

XXVII. A SACRED CONVICTION - - - 202 



THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 



CHAPTER XIV. 

Dora's disappointment. 

Fryston was not nearly ready for occupation 
when Dora Tremlett's honeymoon was over. 
The alterations that Captain Tremlett had 
suggested during that visit to Nun well had 
taken a considerable time to carry out. They 
were not all carried out yet ; it did not seem at 
all likely that the rooms would be fit for occu- 
pation before Christmas. 

Dora was counting the days to get back. 
No honeymoon had ever dragged so heavily ; 
the slow weeks refused to pass. It seemed to 

VOL. II. 15 



2 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

her, at the end of that miserable month, that 
she was no nearer returning home than the day 
she had come away. 

When Mrs. Bellew had settled that Edith 
should be married from her house, she had 
written to her son-in-law and begged him to 
bring Dora up to town for the wedding. He 
could not refuse to do this with very good 
grace, but he had consented unwillingly. He 
was not fond of his wife's bosom friend — he was 
not fond of any of his wife's friends — and he 
had, under the circumstances, a not unnatural 
disinclination to bring her into too close rela- 
tionship with them. So long as he could keep 
Dora away from her family and her friends, he 
could treat her very much as he liked ; but if 
she once returned to her own people, there 
might be unpleasant disclosures, and no one 
could say what would happen. 

Captain Tremlett so far kept his promise to 
his mother-in-law that he brought his wife back 
from Scotland. He did not bring her direct to 



DORA'S DISAPPOINTMENT 3 

town. He stayed at Leicester on the way back 
for a few days' hunting ; and then he found it 
desirable to make a detour and travel by way 
of Cheltenham, and finally he left Dora with 
her maid in Cheltenham, and went up to town 
alone. 

It may be said that Dora should not have 
submitted to such treatment, that she ought to 
have shown some spirit. 

It would not have been easy for her to 
refuse obedience to her husband's commands ; 
it would have taken a woman with more 
courage than she possessed to assert her rights, 
and refuse to be dictated to. There was a 
little scene the night before he went up to 
town, when she understood that she was not 
to be present at Edith's wedding. She shed 
a few tears ; she could not keep her tears 
back when he told her that he was going up 
alone. 

' I can't see what you've got to blubber at,' 
he said in his agreeable way ; ' you've got all you 



4 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

want here. Most women would be satisfied to 
stay here if their husbands wished it.' 

' I should be glad to stay here, Lionel, when 
— when we come back from town ; but I should 
like to go up for Edith's wedding. You don't 
know what she is to me ; we have been more 
than sisters. She was my bridesmaid, you 
remember.' 

' Yes, and helped you to make away with 
that necklace. You hadn't the wit to contrive 
it yourself ; you wanted someone to put you up 
to it. I shouldn't be surprised if she hasn't 
got it — she, or that fellow Yernon.' 

He still believed, or pretended to believe, in 
the existence of a mythical lover of his wife's, 
who was supposed to be in possession of the lost 
diamonds. It was one of his delusions, a 
creation of his disordered brain, and Dora had 
ceased to take any notice of it. She could not 
always tell what he was raving about ; the 
name Yernon was unknown to her, but that did 
not matter. She only knew that he intended 



DORA'S DISAPPOINTMENT 5 

to wound her, and one name was as good as 
another. He was always raving about Yernon, 
when the subject of the missing diamonds 
happened to be uppermost in his mind, but he 
had never coupled Edith's name with them 
before. 

Dora raised her head in surprise — surprise and 
indignation ; she could bear anything herself — 
she had got accustomed to bearing things — but 
she could not listen in silence to this charo^e 
against her dearest friend. 

' I don't think you should say such things 
about Edith Darcy, Lionel. She is going to 
marry a man who would not bear things 
being said about his wife,' she said with some 
spirit. 

' You — you mean that he would horsewhip 
me V Captain Tremlett said mockingly, his dark 
face flushing with passion. 

' I mean that you should be careful what you 
say ; that Derek Stanhope loves the girl he is 
going to marry : he worships the ground she 



6 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

walks on ; he is not the man to let anyone cast 
a slur on his wife's honour.' 

She could not keep a thrill of tenderness, of 
pain, out of her voice ; she was contrasting 
Edith's lot with hers. 

'Oh, oh, oh! we'll see about that.' He 
laughed scornfully as he spoke, and glared 
down at Dora sitting in her low chair beside 
the fire with a sudden fury and exultation in 
his bloodshot eyes that made her shiver. 

She sat there trembling long after he had 
gone, wondering what new cruelty he had in 
his mind, what fresh misery he was planning 
for her. She was sorry that she had mentioned 
Edith's name. 

When Captain Tremlett arrived in town, he 
did not go to his mother-in-law's ; he drove 
straight to Mr. Finch's office. He had sent a 

o 

telegram before he started from Cheltenham, 
arranging an interview with the detective, 
and he drove straight from the station to his 
office. 



DORA'S DISAPPOINTMENT 7 

Mr. Finch had some news for him about the 
diamonds. They had been traced, or, at least, 
some of them liad been traced. He had a clue. 
' That fellow Yernon is in it, I'll be bound,' 
his client said, with some of the flowers of 
speech with which he was wont to adorn his 
conversation. 

The detective looked blank ; he had never 
heard of Mr. Vernon. As that individual only 
existed in the Captain s too fervid imagination, 
this was not to be wondered at. 

' The name is not Yernon,' he said, looking 
immensely wise ; ' unless that is the name of 
the party she is going to marry.' 

' You don't mean it's a woman ?' the Captain 
said, with some expression of astonishment. 
Mr. Finch nodded his head. 
The case was not complete, and he declined 
to commit himself to a statement. It was very 
nearly complete ; there were a few links wanting 
in the chain of evidence. When complete, it 
would, the detective averred, be as pretty a 



8 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

bit of circumstantial evidence as he had come 
across for some time. He prided himself on 
the ingenuity with which he had pieced it 
together. There was not a man in London, 
he said, who could have followed out the clue 
as he had followed it out. The police had 
declared themselves baffled ; they had sus- 
pected several people, but they had not got 
hold of a clue. The detective that Sir 
Bourchier had employed had also failed. He, 
too, had suspected certain people, and he had 
got hold of a clue, but nothing had resulted 
from his inquiries. Not a single trace of 
the necklace had been discovered. It was 
from a name that this man had let drop that 
Dora's husband got that absurd delusion about 
a former lover. 

He was a young detective, and he was almost 
too clever. He never suspected people that 
the experienced members of the force suspected ; 
he was working on a different line, and held 
certain theories about the missing diamonds 



DORA'S DISAPPOINTMENT 9 

that no detective in his senses would have held 
for a moment. Whatever his theories were 
worth, he had not found the necklace. 

His inquiries had taken up a long time ; they 
had diverted him entirely from the right scent, 
and they had ended in disappointment. He 
had really found out nothing, for all his clever- 
ness. He had tracked the man Venner — his 
name was Yenner, not Yernon — and kept a 
watch on his movements for a month past. 
There was some secret understanding, he had 
discovered, between this man and Mrs. Bellew's 
new maid. There had been stolen meetings in 
the gi^ounds at Nunwell of nights, of which 
the detective had been an unseen witness. 

He had not learnt much from these meetings, 
except that the woman always came unwillingly, 
and that she generally went away crying. The 
man intimidated her ; she would not have stolen 
out to meet him if she had not been afraid to 
disobey him. She did not come of her own 
free will, and she went- back through the 



10 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

shrubbery crying, until she came in sight of the 
liouse. 

Most likely he was an old lover, and he was 
trading on some incident of past weakness or 
folly to intimidate her and use her as a means 
of extortion. 

The detective found out all about the fellow. 
He was a journeyman painter, and he had 
been six months in the employ of the distin- 
guished firm he was then working for. His 
antecedents had been rather shady ; he did not 
appear to have kept any situation for a great 
leno'th of time, and there were lono^ intervals 
between his engagements. He was out of work 
more often than he was in work. Still, in the 
expressive language of the profession, ' there 
was nothing against him.' He had not been 
previously convicted. 

It was almost past reason to believe that, if 
he had got possession of the missing diamonds, 
he would have been willing to continue work- 
ing at Fryston as a journeyman painter — that 



DORA'S DISAPPOINTMENT ii 

he would not have found some excuse for 
throwing up his work and Hving at ease on the 
proceeds of his spoil. He was not exactly the 
man to work when he had the means to play. 

Putting these things together, the detective 
had begun to think he was on the wrong scent; 
that he had wasted a gTeat deal of valuable 
time upon Patience and her lover. 



CHAPTER XV. 

EDITH DARCy's WEDDING-DAY. 

Edith did not go back to Lowndes Square till 
the day before the wedding. The illness of her 
aunt was a sufficient reason for the delay. 
Miss Gunning was really ill ; she was ' break- 
ing up,' as the doctors expressed it. She had 
had an iron constitution in her time, but it 
could not last for ever. It had lasted for over 
fourscore years, and now it was ' breaking up.' 

The decay, or the falling to pieces, rather — 
the decay had been going on for years — began 
at the top. Her brain, the doctors agreed, 
was quite gone ; she would never be free from 
delusions again. 



EDITH DARCY'S WEDDING-DAY 13 

Her last delusion was that she was going to 
be married ; she was busy all day with prepa- 
rations for the wedding. 

She would insist on being dressed at seven 
o'clock on these raw, misty October mornings, 
in order to be ready in time for the ceremony ; 
and she would array herself for the occasion in 
the most fantastic garments. 

The doctors had given orders that she was to 
be humoured in her whims, that she was not to 
be excited by opposition, so long as they did 
not take any mischievous form. Penfold duti- 
fully waited upon her mistress, and turned out 
her drawers in obedience to her wishes, and 
covered the bed and the furniture of her room 
with the old-fashioned, faded finery of her 
youth. Her jew^elry had long ago been re- 
moved to a place of safety by the trustees, 
and there were only a few ornaments of little 
value left behind. Whatever trinkets Penfold 
could find, the poor old soul put on, by way of 
adornment for her w^edding : chains about her 



14 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

neck, and brooches pinned on indiscriminately, 
and gold eyeglasses suspended over her ears by 
way of earrings ; and, to crown all, a wreath of 
artificial roses — roses whose blooms had faded 
half a century ago — on her wide-frilled night- 
cap. Sometimes she would have a lace veil 
thrown over her, and, thus adorned, she would 
sit patiently through the long weary day wait- 
ing for the coming of the bridegroom. 

She was sitting up in bed, arrayed in this 
sad, fantastic fashion, when Edith went in to 
wish her good-bye, the day she returned to 
Lowndes Square. It was not likely that she 
would ever see her again ; she would have to 
carry away with her for the rest of her life 
the remembrance of this last sad sight. The 
pitifulness of it broke her down ; she was 
not given to breaking down, but she could 
not look on this poor masquerade without 
tears. 

To come to this at the end of a long life ! 
To live a selfish, narrow existence, unloving 



EDITH DARCY'S WEDDING-DAY 15 

and unloved, for fourscore years, and come to 
this at the end ! 

' I have come to say good-bye, Aunt Maria,' 
she said, standing beside her bed, with her wet 
eyes, and a Httle break in her voice. ' Good- 
bye, and God bless you for all your kindness to 
me ! I may never have a chance of thanking 
you again, and I want you to know — I am sure 
you will be able to understand by-and-by, if 
you don't understand what I say now — that I 
am not ungrateful for all your kindness to me. 
I would have loved you more if you would have 
let me. I don't know who has been in fault ; 
perhaps we both have. We thought we could 
get on without love, and we made a mistake, 
and we have found it out too late. I hope God 
will make up to you by-and-by for what you 
have missed here.' 

Her tears were fallinof on the old wrinkled 
hand that lay on the coverlet. She was 
genuinely sorry as she stood there that she 
had not tried to do more for the old woman 



i6 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

while she had been with her — that she had 
given her back so little. 

It is not of much use being sorry ; sorrow, 
regret, remorse, always come too late. Some- 
thing in her voice or manner, or the tears fall- 
ing on her hand, may have stirred some dim 
memories in the old woman's clouded mind. 

* I kept them for you, my dear. I always 
iatended them for you ; there is no other Edith 
Gunning.' 

' What did you intend for me, Aunt Maria V 
Edith asked. 

' What — what — what V The memory seemed 
to have failed again ; presently she looked up 
with a light in her dim eyes. ' It is in the 
bureau,' she said. 

' What is in the bureau V Edith asked 
eagerly. 

She was thinking of the diamonds. Of 
course it would be nothing ; it would not be a 
legal gift if her aunt, in her present state, were 
to give them to her ; still, it would be a satis- 



EDITH DARCY'S WEDDING-DAY 17 

faction to know that she wished her to have 
them, to feel that, whatever arose, they were 
hers — her own. 

The old woman on the bed put aside the veil 
with a gesture of impatience. 

' Don't you know V she said querulously. 
* Don't you know that it has been there waiting 
for years ' 

' What has been there for years, Aunt Maria ? 
What is it you wish me to have ?' 

It was her last chance ; she may be forgiven 
for being eager. 

* The wedding-cake !' Miss Gunning said, in a 
confidential whisper. ' It has been there for 
fifty years ; but it is for you — it is all for 
you !' 

Edith sighed. 

She had to go away ; it was no use standing 
there listening to the unreasoning words let fall 
by a madwoman. If she had stayed there a 
minute longer she would have lost her train. 

She went away, and left the old woman 

VOL. II. 16 



I8 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

sitting up in bed, in her wreath and veil, with 
the two white cats solemnly watching her, 
waiting for the bridegroom. 

She did not reach Lowndes Square until late 
in the day, in the gray, cheerless October dusk. 
It was the end of October — it was just Novem- 
ber — and the November fogs had already begun. 
It was a raw, cheerless afternoon, with the gray 
November fog coming down from the leaden 
sky, and closing around her when the cab that 
had brought her from the station stopped at 
Lowndes Square. The dark porch of the house 
and the iron railings seemed to loom out of the 
fog to greet her, as she stepped out of the cab. 
There was nothing else to greet her ; no one 
had met her at the station, no one was at home 
to receive her. Mrs. Bellew had gone off to 
Paddlngton to meet Dora ; her husband had 
relented at the last, and had promised that she 
should come, and her mother had gone off with 
a beating heart to meet her. 

She did riot come back until Edith had been 



EDITH DARCY'S WEDDING-DAY 19 

ill the house an hour, and then she came back 
alone. Dora had not come, after all. There 
was a telegram awaiting her when she got back 
that explained her absence, but it did not 
explain it very satisfactorily. 

' Something unforeseen has happened,' the 
telegram ran, ' and my presence at Edith's 
wedding would add to the difficulty. You will 
understand to-morrow that it was better for me 
to keep away.' 

'What does she mean?' Mrs. Bellew said 
tearfully. ' How can anything have happened 
to make it better for her to stay away V 

She could not keep her tears back ; she was 
Ro broken down with this disappointment that 
she sat down and cried, and Edith said what 
she could to comfort her. 

' I'm afraid it is on my account,' she said. ' I 
am sure Captain Tremlett does not like me. He 
is a little jealous of Dora having an affection 
for anyone else ; he wants to have her all to 
himself.' 



20} THE TREMLETT DIAIMONDS 

' My dear, he can have no love for the poor 
child at all. If he had any love for her, he 
would not treat her as he does. I cannot think 
what made him marry her !' 

And then the poor mother, sitting there 
weeping in the firelight, poured out into Edith's 
sympathetic ears the story of Dora's woes — the 
story so far as she had heard it. 

' I think he is a brute 1' Edith said indig- 
nantly, when she had finished. ' The poor, 
innocent darling has no brother of her own to 
take her part, or he would not dare to treat 
her so. He is a horrid, mean, cowardly brute ! 
Oh, how I wish Derek could give him a good 
horsewhipping !' 

Edith could think of nothing all the evening 
but Dora's unhappiness, when she ought to 
have been thinking of the morrow. She was 
dull and depressed all the evening, when she 
ought to have been at her brightest and best. 
Her lover could not tell what had come to her. 

' What is it that is worrying you, darling ?» 



EDITH DARCY'S WEDDING-DAY 21 

he asked her once, when he saw two distinct 
little upright lines on her smooth forehead. ' I 
am sure you have got something on your 
mind.' 

She tried to laugh away his fears, but the 
tears came into her eyes ; she could not keep 
them back. 

' It is nothing,' she said — ' it is nothing. I 
was not thinking about myself.' 

This was not quite accurate ; she was really 
thinking a good deal about herself all through 
that long, long night before her wedding. She 
thought the night would never go, and yet she 
dreaded the morning. She lay awake all 
through the night counting the hours, and in 
the gray dreary dawn, when she ought to have 
been waking up, she fell asleep. 

A dreadful doubt haunted her all through 
those wakeful hours. She had not been so 
frank with the man she was about to marry 
as she should have been ; she had kept some- 
thing back. She had misled him as to certain 



22 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

things — things that he might some day find out 
— and she could not justify herself for the de- 
ception. Before the morning dawned she had 
made up her mind — quite made up her mind — 
that before the wedding took place she would 
tell him the whole truth ; she would keep 
nothing: back. There should be no cause for 
reproach in the future. 

That hour or tAvo of refreshing sleep had 
done something for her ; but when she got up 
and looked in the glass, she told herself she 
was not looking at all like a bride. Her eye- 
lids were heavy, and there were dark rims 
beneath her eyes, and there was not a vestige 
of colour in her cheeks. She was feeling weak, 
and tired, and miserable. All her good inten- 
tions had oozed away ; they had died quite out 
when the morning came. 

Her weakness and helplessness overpowered 
her, and, instead of cheerfully setting about the 
delightful task of putting on her wedding 
clothes, she sat down on tlie side of the 



EDITH DARCY'S WEDDING-DAY 23 

bed and sobbed in a kind of recklessness of 
despair. 

* Why should I tell him V she asked herself. 
' He need never, never know. And it was for 
his sake : I could not bear that he should be 
reproached. It is more than I can do to tell 
him !' 

Mrs. Bellew s maid came into the room and 
found Edith sobbing on the edge of the bed, 
when she ought to have been up and dressed. 
She could not hide her agitation from the girl, 
but she dried her eyes, and set about making her 
preparations, but without any hopefulness or 
cheerfulness. There was a dull weight at her 
heart that she could not get rid of — could not 
account for. 

Everybody declared, when she came down- 
stairs to breakfast, that she was looking fright- 
ful ; she was not looking at all as a bride 
ought to look. The bridegroom's sisters, who 
came early to help her to dress, whispered 
together about her altered looks ; they could 



24 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

not think what poor Derek could see m her. 
Most of the people who came to the wedding 
were of the same opinion. Her cousins, 
Richard Darcy's daughters, thought she was 
very lucky to get a man to marry her : if she 
had let this chance slip — it was not much of a 
chance, they owned — she would never have got 
another. 

White had never suited Edith — it was too 
much like her face ; only to-day her face was 
gray, not white, and she had not a particle of 
colour to relieve it. No one could understand 
why, with such a complexion, she had chosen a 
white wedding gown. There is some fiction 
about maiden purity in the selection of white 
for a bridal colour. Perhaps this may have 
guided Edith's choice ; but it was an unhappy 
choice. She thought of the poor figure she 
had left sitting up in the great four-post bed- 
stead at Gotham, as she stood before the glass 
in her bridal wreath and veil. 

The thought almost broke her down again ; 



EDITH DARCY'S WEDDING-DAY 25 

for a moment she wavered in her resolution. 
If the bridegroom had been there, instead of 
waiting for her at the church, she would have 
told him then ; she would not have gone on 
with the wedding without telling him. Now 
that it was too late, she was anxious to tell 
him ; she was more than anxious— she was wild 
to tell him ! He would not come to the house 
again till after the wedding, when it w^ould be 
too late ; she had let the opportunity slip, and 
there would not be another. She could hardly 
take him aside in the church, before all those 
people, and tell him. No ; it was clearly too 
late. Whatever confession she had to make 
would have to be made after the wedding. 

The people were all gathered in the drawing- 
room below — her uncle Kichard, who was to 
give her away ; and his wife, whom she hated ; 
and the girl cousins, who were to act as brides- 
maids. She had got together as good a muster 
of relatives as she could, that Derek's people 
should not think her friendless. His mother 



26 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

and father were awaiting them at the church ; 
but his sisters were to follow in Edith's train. 
They were good-natured girls, and they were 
sorry for their brother — sorry he was not going 
to do any better, that he had got such a bad 
bargain. If they had chosen for him, it would 
have been different ; but he had not consulted 
them in his choice. 

The bride came downstairs at last, a white, 
washed-out-looking bride, with dark circles 
round her eyes. People could not think what 
she was making such a fuss about ; the very 
best thing that could happen to her was to get 
married. She hadn't a single tie in the world, 
nothing to hold her back, and she was marrying 
a man who adored her. Most girls in her 
place would have been hardly able to con- 
tain their happiness ; they would have jumped 
for joy, if it had been decorous for brides to 
jump. 

Edith was very far from jumping as she came 
slowly down the stairs in her white, with the 



EDITH DARCY'S WEDDING-DAY 27 

two youngest bridesmaids behind her carrying 
her train. It seemed quite ridiculous to spend 
so much money on a wedding gown, on all those 
yards and yards of white satin, merely to drag 
it behind her on the ground, when she wanted 
the money so much for other things — for need- 
ful things. Edith had her own reasons for this 
useless expenditure. She w^anted her husband 
to be proud of her. She would not have had 
him ashamed of her for the world. 

All this show — the breakfast in Lowndes 
Square ; the carriages — the Square w^as full of 
carriages ; the wedding guests ; the white 
favours on the breasts of the seivants ; the 
bows on the horses' ears — was for him. She 
would have done without all this herself. She 
would have loved to do without it, to have 
walked quietly into an obscure church, and 
stood alone beside him before the altar, and 
made her vows. 

Perhaps she was thinking of this as she came 
down the stairs, with her white satin gown 



28 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

rustling behind her. The hall was full of guests 
waiting to see her pass out, and there was a 
crowd collected on the pavement before the 
door. A scarlet cloth had been thrown down 
over the steps to the carriage, and the crowd 
were pressing round on either side. It seemed 
nothinof but a sea of faces before her as she 
went down the stairs — a sea of eager, watchful 
faces, piled and heaped up in the hall, on the 
steps, outside in the street, as faces are crowded 
together at a theatre. They all seemed to 
swim before her eyes as she came slowly down 
the stairs — she could not see distinctly for the 
mist before her eyes — she only saw the crowd ; 
and she was dimly conscious that there was 
some confusion in the hall below, that the men 
were pressing round, and the women were 
drawing back ; — and there was a suppressed 
sound, like a cry, in the air. 

She never knew how it all happened. The 
faces that had been looking up to her so smiling 
and eager were turned suddenly into stone. 



EDITH DARCY'S WEDDING-DAY 29 

It all happened in a moment ; the confusion, 
the little knot of men gathered in the hall, the 
earnest consultation, the awestruck whisper 
that stole around, the wedding guests falling 
back affrighted, and a man disengaging himself 
from the rest, and coming forward to meet her 
at the foot of the stairs. 

He had his hand upon her arm before she 
knew it, upon the gloved hand and arm that 
carried the wedding bouquet, and his voice was 
in her ears — a strange voice, and strange 
words : 

* I arrest you on the charge of having stolen 
a diamond necklace.' 



CHAPTER XYI. 

HE KNEW HE WAS RIGHT. 

It had been cruelly arranged. It had been 
arranged with diabolical malice and cruelty, to 
arrest a bride on such a charge, at such a 
moment. 

When anything at all could be done, when 
anybody was able to think of anything,, 
messages were sent to the church — not explicit 
messages, but messages to the effect that there- 
would be no wedding. 

The uncle of the bride, Mr. Hichard Darcy,. 
was the first person who recovered his wits, wha 
was able to grasp the situation ; he hurried the 
frightened bridesmaids back to their respective 



HE KNEW HE WAS RIGHT 31 

homes, and dismissed the guests. He had to 
stay behind himself — it was his brother's child, 
he could not very well go away — but he staved 
with a bad grace. 

' I am sure you ought to come with us, 
Richard,' his wife said indignantly, as he was 
putting her into the carriage. ' You ought not 
to get mixed up with this disgraceful affair ; 
you should consider your own children. Of 
course she is guilty ! Where else could she have 
got all the money from ? I always doubted her.' 

A great many people thought Edith guilty 
besides her aunt. Everybody had heard the 
story of the missing necklace, and now the 
mystery was explained. Edith had had it in 
her possession all the time. 

The father and mother of the bridegroom had 
driven back from the church to Lowndes Square 
for an explanation, and when they were in- 
formed what had happened, they had gone back 
to their hotel. They had gone back with the 
firm conviction that Edith was guilty. 



32 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

Only the bridegroom had remained behind ; 
everybody else had gone away. Richard Darcy 
had counselled him to go away, too. He had 
explained to him that now, of course, every- 
thing was at an end ; it would be better for him 
to go away. It was lucky that it had happened 
when it did, before the wedding ; but now there 
was no reason why his name should be mixed 
up in this most deplorable affair. The wisest 
thing for him to do was to go away. 

Still the bridegroom remained behind. 
. ' I will never believe her guilty,' he said, 
^ until I hear it from her own lips.' 

Edith could not have seen her lover alone if 
she had wished. A man was waiting on the 
landing, outside her bedroom door, while she 
changed her dress. She had to take off her 
wedding things and put on another gown ; she 
could not go to prison dressed in all her wedding 
finery. The man was unwilling to lose sight 
of her, but he consented to wait outside the 
door. If Derek Stanhope spoke to her, he 



HE KNEW HE WAS RIGHT ^^ 

would have to speak to her in the presence of 
others. 

He saw her as she came down the stands, 
with Mrs. Bellew's arms around her. Mrs. 
Bellew was weeping ; she would not believe 
her guilty ; she thought it was some cruel 
devilry devised by her amiable son-in-law. 

Edith was walking down the stairs like one 
in a dream. She was so stunned and bewil- 
dered that she could not understand what had 
happened. The blow had been so sudden and 
unexpected that it had stunned her into un- 
consciousness. She w^as only able to realize the 
terrible abasement the shock would be to her 
lover ; she did not seem to think of herself. 

She saw his white face at the foot of the 
stairs, as he came forward to lead her into the 
room — into the wretched room where her 
wedding feast was spread. 

The policeman came in with her, and someone 
closed the door behind them. The meeting was 
too sacred for curious eyes. 

VOL. II. 17 



34 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

' Darling !' he said. He could not say 
another word ; he could only take her to his 
bosom. ' Darling !' 

Her dry-eyed terror and grief gave way at 
the sound of his dear voice, and she was sobbing 
violently on his breast. 

* Oh, why was I ever born, to bring this 
shame upon you !' she sobbed. 

He could not answer her wild appeal ; he 
could only strain her to his breast. But her 
words cut him like a knife. 

' Must I go with them, Derek— must I go ? 
Can't you save me V she cried, in the bewilder- 
ment of her terror, clinging to him desperately 
with her trembling hands. 

' Darling,' he said hoarsely, with his face 
very pale and his lips quivering — ' darling, I 
would give my life to save you !' 

' Must I go, Derek ? Is — is there no help V 
she asked wildly. 

He shook his head; he could not trust himself 
to look at her — to read the agony in her dear face. 



HE KNEW HE WAS RIGHT 35 

* There is no help,' he said, with a groan. 
' Oh, my God ! that I should have to stand by, 
and not be able to help you !' 

She uttered a cry of pain like some wounded 
thing. She could not understand that he could 
do nothing ; she was too stunned to reason. 
She shrank out of his embrace. What was his 
love worth if it could not help her ? She had 
no one else to appeal to, and he would not help 
her. 

'Go!' she repeated, with a shudder — 'go, 
go ! Oh yes, I am ready to go ! It cannot 
matter now what becomes of me !' 

' Edith,' he said, ' for pity's sake, do not leave 
me like this ! Remember, whatever happens, I 
love you !' 

She did not seem to hear what he said ; she 
followed the men out of the room, and out of 
the house, and got into the carriage that was 
waiting at the door — the carriage that had 
brought the bridegroom back from the church. 
The coachman still had a white favour in his 



36 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

buttonhole as he drove away. She might have 
been going off for her honeymoon, only that 
Mrs. Belle w was inside with her instead of the 
bridegroom, and there was a policeman on the 
box. 

Mrs. Bellew would not let Edith go alone ; 
she went with her, and Derek Stanhope fol- 
lowed behind in a cab. He did not know 
how he got out of the house. He was like 
one demented ; his mind was in a whirl ; he 
could not think with this cloud of agony 
and shame obscuring everything ; he was con- 
scious of nothing but a feeling of immeasurable 
pity. 

When the cab reached the station, there was 
nothing to be done. Edith would be charged 
with stealing the necklace the following day 
before a magistrate, and until then nothing 
could be done. He had to see the prison doors 
close upon her, and go away and leave her to 
her fate. 

He would willingly have changed places with 



HE KNEW HE WAS RIGHT 37 

her, if that would have been any good, but 
nothing that he could do or say could help her. 
His love was no o^ood to her. he told himself; 
he could not save her from a single pang. His 
love meant very little to her, after all. It was 
clearly no use standing outside that closed door, 
beating his head against the wall ; it would not 
avail her if he beat it to a jelly. He got into 
the cab again, and di'ove to the Temple and 
saw his lawyer, and brought him back with him 
to the place where Edith was confined. 

She refused to see the lawyer whom he 
brought ; she was too overwhelmed with what 
had happened to be in a fit state to see any- 
one, and she was unable to write. Her temples 
were throbbino^ with the mental ao^itation she 
had o'one throuofh, and her brain was stunned 
and bewildered ; she did not seem to want 
anything but to lie down and die. 

After his fruitless attempts to help Edith he 
went back to the hotel where his people were 
staying. 



38 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

They were already packing up to go back 
when he reached there. There was nothing 
for them to stay for ; there could be no wed- 
ding now, and the sooner they got back to 
their own place the better. 

Mrs. Stanhope was in tears, and the girls 
were hot and indignant. 

' Oh, my poor boy, what an escape for you !' 
his mother said, as she pressed the reluctant 
bridegroom in her arms. ' Think what would 
have happened if you had married her !' 

' I should have been better able to defend 
her, mother ; that's all that would have hap- 
pened,' he said with some heat. 

' Defend her ! You don't mean to say that 
you will ever have anything more to do with 
that — that abandoned creature !' 

Mrs. Stanhope couldn't find any other word 
to express Edith's guilt. The colour quite for- 
sook her face at her son's words. 

' You forget, mother, that you are speaking 
of my affianced wife,' her son said sternly. 



HE KNEW HE WAS RIGHT 39 

' Wife !' gasped the poor woman, sinking 
into a chair. ' You don't mean that you would 
marry her after this V 

' I shall most certainly marry her,' he said 
gi-avely. 

' Derek, you must be mad !' screamed his 
sisters in a breath. 

They had taken off their pretty bridesmaids' 
dresses, and they had put on their travelling 
gowns, and they were cross and indignant and 
disappointed. They had been making prepara- 
tions for weeks past for the wedding — they 
had talked of nothing else — and now there was 
to be no wedding. 

' I think you had better go back with us, 
my boy,' his father said kindly. ' It won't do 
for you to stay here and get mixed up with 
this unhappy affair. You must think of your 
mother and the girls.' 

'You wouldn't have me run away from 
her in her trouble, sir V the young man said 
hotly. 



40 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

' I don't see what else you can do, my boy. 
It's a terrible scandal ; the police must have 
got a pretty clear case, or they wouldn't have 
gone to this length. It would never do for 
you to be mixed up with it. You could hardly 
stay in the regiment if — if you took her part. 
It would be laying yourself open to — well, if 
not suspicion, to question. Your name would 
be in everybody's mouth.' 

Derek Stanhope flushed scarlet ; he had cer- 
tainly not thought of it in that light ; he had 
not had time, indeed, to think of anything. 

* I should send in my resignation, sir,' he 
said huskily. 

* Dear Derek, do listen to reason,' his mother 
pleaded tearfully ; ' think of your family be- 
fore you do anything rash. The woman who 
could do this base, this shameful act can be 
nothing to you in the future ; she is not worth 
a thought. If she is guilty, Derek, you must 
give her up ; you must not bring shame and 
disgrace upon your family.' 



HE KNEW HE WAS RIGHT 41 

' But she is not guilty, mother !' 

' That has to be proved. They would not 
have arrested her at such a time if the evidence 
had not been clear aor-ainst her. For the sake 
of your family, Derek, promise me you will do 
nothino^ rash.' 

' I can make no promises, mother. If it had 
happened half an hour later, Edith would have 
been my wife, and I should have been bound 
to protect her, to make her cause mine. You 
would not have me desert her in her extremity 
because the ceremony hadn't actually taken 
place V 

' No, thank God it hadn't taken place !' said 
his mother fervently. 

' I am just as much bound as if it had taken 
place,' Derek said, with a quiet determination 
in his voice that went to her heart. ' I am 
her natural protector. She has no one else ; 
she is alone in the world. Good God ! mother, 
what do you think of me, that I should desert 
her in her trouble T 



42 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

It was no use reasoning with him ; he would 
not be persuaded. He could not see that he 
owed it to his family to desert the woman he 
loved in her sore distress. He went away, if not 
exactly in a rage, hot and indignant, and vow- 
ing that nothing should hinder him, no con- 
siderations of love or duty should keep him 
from doing what he conceived he was bound in 
honour to do — to stand by his betrothed wife 
throuefh thick and thin. There was a manli- 
ness in his decision ; if he had been anyone 
else, they would have said he was right. 

He left his mother in tears : and the girls, if 
not exactly tearing their hair and stamping 
their feet, were certainly not behaving well. 

' I think she is a mean, horrid creature !' 
Lucy, his eldest sister, screamed after him as 
he beat an inglorious retreat. ' I hope she'll be 
sent to the treadmill, and that they'll cut off 
all her hideous black hair' (Lucy had yellow 
hair), ' and keep her on bread and water ' 

He did not stay to hear any more. He 



HE KNEW HE WAS RIGHT 43 

heard quite enough to know what reception his 
future bride might expect from the members of 
his family. 

It was remarkable, the unanimity with which 
the female members of both families decided 
that Edith was guilty. They had not waited 
for the verdict of judge and jury ; they had 
settled it for themselves. They had jumped, 
as the female mind is wont to jump, at the 
conclusion that Edith had stolen the necklace. 
Her own relatives — her aunt and cousins — 
were not a whit more lenient in their judgment 
than the relatives of her lover. They w^ere 
sure she was guilty from the first. Where 
else could she have got the money for the 
wedding, and for furnishing that flat they had 
heard so much about, if she had not stolen the 
diamonds ? 



CHAPTER XYII. 

AT THE POLICE-COURT. 

Edith was formally charged at the police-court 
before a mao^istrate the next mornine:. 

Her lover and the lawyer who had come to 
her on the previous day were waiting for her 
in the court when she was brought in, and 
Mrs. Bellew drove up presently. She had come 
prepared to offer bail to any amount, if the 
magistrate would release her. 

It was only a police-court inquiry — a mere 
formal charge — and there was only one magis- 
trate on the bench. The case had come on 
early, and there were not many people present. 

Edith was led into the court by a policeman; 



AT THE POLICE-COURT 45 

she had to be led in — she did not seem able to 
walk. Her hands were clenched tightly before 
her, and her eyes were cast down, and the 
pallor of her face was frightful. She might 
have been going through some terrible ordeal. 

The magistrate on the bench compassionated 
her weakness and her evident distress, and re- 
quested that a chair might be given her. It 
was not until the charge had been formally 
made that she looked round and saw her lover. 
He was standing as near to her as he was 
allowed to stand ; and Mrs. Bellew was almost 
by her side. She did not see her ; she did 
not see anyone but Derek. Her narrow world 
only held one person ; she had no eyes for any 
other. 

In that first raj)id glance she saw the change 
that the last twenty-four hours had made in 
him. His face was as white as her own, and 
his lips were trembling. He could not keep 
his lips steady, and there was a great com- 
passion and tenderness in his eyes when they 



46 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

met hers. She could not mistake the look in 
his eyes. She nearly broke down when she 
saw him standino* there, ready to come to her 
aid — ready to lay down his life for her, if need 
be. Her self-possession almost deserted her ; 
her hands were nervously working, and she 
was unconsciously fingering her engagement- 
ring. She had come away without gloves, and 
her hands were bare. 

Her eyes met his for one moment. Someone 
was asking her a question. She did not heed 
the question ; she was looking over to her lover. 

There was a sad, yearning pity in the dear 
eyes that went to her heart. He was calmer 
than she was — calmer and firmer, in spite of 
the ghastly paleness of his face. He was look- 
ing at her across the squalid and miserable 
surroundings of the police-court with a look 
she could not mistake, that spoke to her heart 
as plain as words : 

^ I have faith in you ; though all the world 
doubt you, I have faith in you.' 



AT THE POLICE-COURT 47 

She did not know how she would have got 
through that horrible ordeal if it had not been 
for his presence, and that message in his eyes. 

She could not understand at all what was 
going on. Some men were talking together at 
a table in the body of the court, and someone 
was asking questions. The questions did not 
seem to have anything to do with the case. 
Her head was so confused that she could not 
understand what they were saying. It would 
not have helped her if she had. It seemed to 
her that they kept her sitting there for hours, 
while the talking and whispering went on. She 
heard her own name spoken now and then by 
strange voices, and she hardly recognised it for 
hers. It was all strange and unreal. The 
voices seemed to be speaking at a distance ; 
what they said did not seem to have anything 
to do with her, and the name — the name they 
were bandying about — belonged to another. 

When the ceremony was over, the dreadful 
formalitv, the hideous mockerv, of which she 



48 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

had not understood a word, the man who had 
brought her into the court took her out. The 
moment she was outside the court she found 
herself surrounded by friends. Mrs. Bellew had 
got her in her arms, and her lover was by her 
side. 

They had bailed her out. 

She had been committed for trial at the 
Central Criminal Court, but bail had been 
applied for and accepted. Mrs. Bellew and 
Derek between them bore her through the 
dreadful purlieus of the court to a carriage that 
was waiting for her outside. 

There was very little said on the way as they 
drove back. She did not understand what had 
happened : how should she ? She had never 
heard of the Central Criminal Court before in 
her life. She would not have comprehended 
what it meant — the committal for trial at some 
far-off time, and the bailing out. She would 
not have understood, in her bewildered state, 
if they had explained it to her. 



AT THE POLICE-COURT 49 

She had an impression as she drove back, a 
vague impression, that it was all over, and that 
she was free. 

It had all been a mistake, a hideous mis- 
take, but it was all over now. and she was 
free. 

Something happened on the way back from 
the police-court. The carriage stopped at a 
low door in a deserted street. It was a dark, 
foggy November day, and Edith could not 
recognise the place ; she could only see a few 
yards before her. They had stopped at the 
door of a church, but the fog had swallowed up 
the steeple. She got out obediently; it did not 
matter to her where she went, if they were with 
her. She would not let go of Mrs. Belle ws 
hand ; she clung to her like a child. 

' It is all right, dear,' Mrs. Bellew whispered 
to her encouragingly; ' it is the only thing he 
could do. If he had been my son, it is what I 
should have wished him to do.' 

Still, Edith did not understand. 

VOL. II. 18 



50 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

When she passed beneath the low door into 
the dark gloom of the church, she looked round 
in vague alarm. 

* What is it ?' she said tremulously — ' what V 
Her lover had drawn her arm tightly in his, 

and he was hurrying her forward, and Mrs. 
Bellew was holding her hand. They drew her 
on between them until they reached the 
chancel, where some lights she saw were burn- 
ing on the altar. 

Then, for the first time, as they paused before 
the chancel rails, Edith understood it. 

' Oh ! what is this you are doing V she said, 
turning to her lover in sudden affright. ' You 
would not marry me after that, Derek V 

* Darling,' he said, his voice shaken with 
emotion he could not control, ' darling, why 
speak of it any more ? Whatever is past, let it 
be over and gone. Whatever may be in the 
future, you will have me to bear it with you. 
It is my place to defend you — to protect you 
aofainst all the world.' 



AT THE POLICE-COURT 51 

Derek was calmer than she was, thoucrh his 
face was pale and his lips were Avorking. 

Edith hesitated for a moment, and then she 
looked appealingly to Mrs. Bellew, who was 
standing by her side. 

' Tell me what to do,' she said helplessly, in 
a voice of eager entreaty ; ' tell me if he can 
marry me, after — after what has happened?' 

' If he has faith in you, of course he can 
marry you. It is the right thing for him to do. 
You must give him the right to protect you.' 

' Darling,' he said, and the tones of his low 
voice thrilled: her, and seemed to reach her 
heart, ' I have" faith in you. I believe in your 
innocence as I believe in Heaven. Whoever is 
guilty, it IS not you. Whatever you have to 
meet in the future, we must meet it together. 
We must never again be divided, Edith.' 

She did not understand what he meant by 
that reference to the future ; she only knew 
that he believed her innocent of the shameful 
thing that had been imputed to her. 



LIBRARlf 

UNIVERSmr OF ILLINOIS 



52 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

While Derek was speaking, the priest had 
come out of the vestry, and he was standing 
inside the altar-rails. 

Trembling, but still dry-eyed and calm, she 
got through the service. She did not break 
down until the last — until it was all over ; and 
then they had to bear her, weeping hysteri- 
cally, into the carriage that was waiting out- 
side. 

Edith and her husband left Dover, en route 
for the Continent for their honeymoon, a few 
hours later in the day. Their happiness had 
not been long delayed ; but it had been sobered 
— and saddened. 

There had. been nobody present at the 
weddins: but Mrs. Bellew and the clerk of the 
church. All the preparations that had been 
made were wasted. The wedding breakfast 
had been cleared away untouched ; and the 
cake, crowned with a beautiful temple of 
Hymen in white sugar, was hidden away in a 
dark cupboard under the stairs. A great deal 



AT THE POLICE-COURT 53 

of money had been wasted on these fooHsh 
things that might have been better employed, 
and no good had come of it. The ravishing- 
toilettes of the bridesmaids had been wasted, 
too ; at least, nobody had seen them, and the 
beautiful satin gown of the bride had only been 
put on to be taken off again — never, never to 
be worn again. 

Edith left all her gay clothing behind in 
Lowndes Square ; she could not bear to take 
any of it with her. It had cost her so much, 
and the sight of it filled her with inexpressible 
loathing. She could not bear to take Avith 
her on her wedding journey any but the old 
dowdy clothes that she had worn at Nunwell. 
She had ceased to care what people thought of 
her. She did not want to be admired ; even 
the admiration of her lover — he was still her 
lover — was nothing to her : she only wanted to 
be loved. 

He would loA'e her more in her old gowns 
than in her new — her new, which had been 



54 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

bought at such a price ! she told herself with 
a shiver. 

They were far away from England when the 
news of the wedding became known. Captain 
Stanhope had sent it to the papers hi due 
course — the Times, and the Guardian, and the 
Court Journal, and the Morning Post. He 
had made no secret of it. The first notice his 
father had of his son's wedding was the 
announcement in the columns of the Guardian. 

There was real grief and lamentation in that 
distant West Country rectory. The girls were 
loud in their indignation ; and the mother, 
poor lady ! subsided into a passion of weeping 
when the intelligence reached her, and refused 
to be comforted. Derek's father did not join 
in the general outcry ; he went aw^ay by him- 
self, and shut himself up in his study all the 
morning, and when he came out again some 
hours later, the girls declared he looked years 
older — that his hair had gone quite gray. 

This, no doubt, was a pardonable exaggera- 



AT THE POLICE-COURT 55 



tion ; but his friends remarked that there was 
a stoop in his shoulders after that sad day that 
they had never seen in them before. He had 
done so much for his son ; he had practised all 
sorts of self-denial in order that Derek might 
have the same advantao^es as the others, and 
this had been his reward. 

There was consternation, if not dismay, in 
the house of Edith's relatives at Kensino^ton. 
Her seven female cousins shrieked in chorus 
when the news of her marriage reached them. 
They could not understand how a man could be 
so mad. They did not give Edith's bridegroom 
credit for sanity ; they thought he must have 
gone, as they expressed it, ' stark, staring 
mad.' There was no other way to account 
for his infatuation. 

A great many people at the time shared the 
same amiable belief No one could understand 
how a man in his senses could marry a woman 
with this dreadful suspicion hanging over her. 
It went, perhaps, to prove that the days of 



56 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

chivalry were not quite over. An instance is 
required now and then, once in a generation, to 
show that the old noble spirit has not quite 
died out. When it flames up quite unex- 
pectedly amid unheroic surroundings, the 
world shrugs its shoulders and turns away with 
a laugh. It always laughs at the things that 
it does not understand. It did not understand 
Derek Stanhope standing by the woman he 
loved in her misfortune. It called his devotion 
by one of its ambiguous names : it called it 
* quixotism.' 



CHAPTEE XVIII. 

DORA RUNS AWAY. 

Dora Trem Lett's husband was not quite frank 
with her. It was not his nature to be frank. 
He did not tell her that he had caused Edith 
Darcy to be arrested on the charge of stealing 
her diamond necklace. 

He had been up in town a week, and he did 
not return to Cheltenham until the day before 
the wedding. When everything was quite 
settled about the arrest of Edith, he went back 
to join his bride. The week in town had been 
chiefly spent in the company of detectives. 
He had received certain information, and he 
had set the police on a clue that he held, or 



58 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

was supposed to hold ; at least, he had directed 
their inquiries in a certain direction. Before 
the end of the week a sufficiently strong case 
had been made out to induce a magistrate to 
issue a warrant for the apprehension of Edith 
Darcy on the charge of theft. 

The time when the arrest should be made 
had been arranged with diabolical cruelty. 
There had been every opportunity of arresting 
her before ; but the time had been chosen with 
deliberate intention. The inhumanity of the 
act was without parallel. 

Dora only learned these particulars the day 
after the wedding^. Mrs. Bellew wrote to her 
daughter the full account of Edith's arrest, and 
she implored her, as the jewels were hers, to 
withdraw the charge. 

The letter did not reach her until the mid- 
day post ; it had not been written until late 
the night before ; her mother had been too 
agitated by the events of the day to write 
earlier. Dora took the letter at once to her 



DORA RUNS AWAY 59 

husband. She could not wait a minute. It 
was not an auspicious moment to go to him on 
such an errand. Captain Tremlett usually 
spent the morning over his cups, and by noon 
he was well drunk. 

He had been drinking deeper than usual 
this morning, and he was drunk an hour before 
his time. He had the newspaper before him, 
with the account of Edith's arrest in it, which 
he had just been reading when Dora came in. 
The air of the room was reeking with the fumes 
of spirit and thick with tobacco smoke. Dora 
would not have had the courage to go to 
him in his den at any other time, but to-day 
her anger and indignation gave her courage. 

' Oh, Lionel ! what is this ?' she said, laying 
her mother's letter on the table before him. 
' Did you know, did they tell you, they were 
going to do this cruel thing V 

He did not take up the letter she had thrown 
down in her anwr before him ; he was much 
too drunk to have read it if he had. 



6o THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

He laughed a mocking, triumphant laugh. 

' You've heard of it, then T he said in his 
thick, unsteady voice. ' A fine piece of busi- 
ness, isn't it ? The finest thing I've heard ! 
Caught her coming down the stairs in her 
wedding toggery, with the bridesmaids all 
waiting and the carriages at the door !' 

He chuckled to himself, as if it had been a 
joke — a capital joke. 

' You knew of it, then V Dora said, in a voice 
breathless with indignation. 

' Knew of it !' He laughed again at the 
joke ; it seemed to tickle him immensely. 
' Knew of it ? I should rather think I did 
know of it ! They wouldn't have thought of 
it if I hadn't put 'em on the scent.' 

' Then it was you — you — who charged her 
with it ?' Dora cried, her round, childish eyes 
dilating, and her breath coming quick and 
hard. 

' Yes, my dear, it was I who managed it ; 
there is not another man in the world who could 



DORA RUNS AWAY 6i 

have arranged it so well. But I won't take all 
the credit of it ; you shall have your share. It 
was done in your name.' 

' In my name !' 

The horror in her voice — the horror and 
loathing — almost sobered him. 

' In your name, my dear ; they were vour 
diamonds, not mine. The charo-e is made out 
in your name. I am only coupled with it as 
your husband, you know.' 

He laughed his loud, harsh, idiotic laugh, 
and glared at her from under his eyelids with 
a mixture of fury and triumph. 

' No, no, no ! You can never have done this 
cruel thing in my name, Lionel ! You could never 
devise this wicked scheme to injure a woman 
who had never hurt you in her life — because I 
loved her — to make me miserable ! Don't tell 
me that the man I have married could have the 
malicious cunning to do this wicked thing ! I 
will not believe — I cannot believe — that there 
is such inhuman crueltv in man !' 



62 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

Dora was not afraid of him now. She con- 
fronted the big drunken bully with her head 
erect, and her small figure drawn up to its full 
height, and her eyes flashing. 

He had no idea that there was so much spirit 
in her ; for a moment his coarse nature cowered 
before her. He could not meet the blaze of 
indignant anger in her blue eyes. 

' Ah !' he said in a tone of triumph, taking 
up a full glass by his side, and pouring the raw 
spirit down his throat — ' ah ! I've touched you 
at last ! I thought there must be a tender 
spot somewhere, and now I have found it. 
I've got you now ; it's something to think I've 
got you now !' 

His dark, flushed face was burning and glow- 
ing, and his eyes under his heavy brows were 
scowling at her. She could not think what she 
had done to make him hate her like this — to 
provoke the evil passions of his nature to such 
fiendish acts. 

She could not understand ; she did not under- 



DORA RUNS AWAY 63 

stand till long after, and then the miserable 
knowledofe came too late. 

' And you have planned all this cruelty — you 
have ruined an innocent girl — to make me un- 
happy V she said, in a voice thrilling with 
horror and loathing. 

She did not seek to conceal her loathing, her 
disgust, aversion, contempt, for the drunken 
wretch before her. She had forgotten all about 
the vows she had made on that unhappy day 
when the rain was pattering down on the chancel 
roof 

' Ah, I've got you now, my lady !' he rambled 
on, not taking any notice of her anger — ' I've 
got you now ! None of your fine high and 
mighty airs for me ! I'll crush all the spirit out 
of you before I've done with you. I've found 
out how to do it !' 

Dora shivered. 

He had been drinking all the morning, and 
his face was flushed, and there was a wild red 
light in his eyes, like a danger-signal. It was 



64 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

no use standing there talking to him. He was 
not accountable for what he said. No man in 
his senses could say such things. She must 
wait until he was sober, until the fumes of 
the spirit he had been drinking had passed off. 

Dora put out her hand to take up her mother's 
letter, which was lying open on the table before 
him. He saw the action, and seizing her by the 
wrist, he wrenched the letter out of her hand, 
tearing it into a dozen fragments. The attack 
had been so sudden — it had all been the work 
of a moment — that she did not know that her 
wrist was hurt until she had left the room. 
She went upstairs with her heart bursting, and 
a dreadful singing in her head. She was too 
hot and angry to cry. She generally cried 
after a scene with her husband, but she was too 
angry to-day to cry. 

She sat down to think. It was dreadful to 
feel that Edith was in prison, and that nothing 
was being done to release her. She wanted 
someone to advise her ; she was here in a 



DORA RUNS AWAY 65 

strange place, and had no one but her maid to 
go to. Parker came into the room while she 
was sitting there trying to think, and realizing 
how lonely and helpless she was. 

' Good gracious ! what have you done to your 
arm. Miss Dora?' she exclaimed, when she 
caught sight of Dora's swollen wrist. 

It was not only swollen, but there w^ere dark 
discoloured marks imprinted on the tender 
flesh. 

'My arm?' she said, with a sudden pink 
coming into her face. ' Oh, I hurt it, I believe.' 

It is, of course, a woman's duty to shield her 
husband. It is her first duty to suffer and be 
silent, not to parade her wrongs before the 
world. It w^ould not have availed Dora if 
she had taken the world into her confidence. 
However dreadful her lot might be, she told 
herself, she had to bear it. There was no 
escape. 

' Then, whose are those black finger-marks, 
I'd like to know V the serving-woman said, with 

VOL. II. 19 



66 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

fine scorn. ' The Captain's been up to his tricks 
again, I can see ! It was your poor shoulders 
the other day — they are black and blue still 
— and you wouldn't have said a word if I 
hadn't found it out ; and now it's your arm ! 
I told you then, Miss Dora — I gave you fair 
warning — if it happened again, I'd write to my 
mistress.' 

Parker always spoke of Mrs. Bellew as her 
' mistress.' 

* Oh, this is nothing ; it does not matter,' 
Dora said wearily. * If this were all — if it 
were only I who had to suffer — I shouldn't 
mind ; but he has found out a new way to 
torture me, Parker, through those I love. He 
has invented a more refined cruelty. He has 
ptd Judith Darcy in prison ; he has charged her 
with stealing my necklace.' 

* Miss Darcy in prison !' Parker repeated. 
She was much braver than her mistress — she 

was not afraid of the Captain — but she turned 
white to the lips. 



DORA RUNS AWAY 67 

' He had her carried off to prison in her 
wedding clothes, just as she was starting to 
church. Oh, there never was anything so 
cruel, so inhuman ; and he has only done it to 
torture me !' 

' How do you know ? When did you hear ?' 
Parker asked eagerly. ' I thought Miss Darcy 
was married yesterday.' 

' She was taken to prison yesterday, just 
before the weddino^, when the house was full of 
guests. She was taken from our house — that 
is the cruel part— and — and she thinks that I 
have done it, that it is I who have brought this 
cruel charge\against her,' Dora said in a voice 
full of passion and tears. 

' Don't you trouble, Miss Dora ; she knows 
you too. well to think that. She knows who's 
at the bottom of it. But you haven't told me 
how you heard. Perhaps it's only a tale he's 
made up to make you sufPer ; perhaps it's only 
a tale like all the rest.' 
Dora shook her head. 



6^ THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

' Mamma has written and told me all about 
it. She is dreadfully upset and indignant; she 
says I must make him withdraw it. I — I — as 
if I had any power over him ! As if he would 
do anything for my sake ! It was mamma's 
letter that he was snatching away from me 
when he hurt my wrist ; he wanted to destroy 
it. I think he would have been glad if he 
could have rent me to pieces as he rent the 
letter. He looked so evil, so dreadful, that 
I came away. I was frightened, I dared 
not stay ; I had never seen that look on his 
face before.' 

Dora shivered as she recalled her husband's 
words and looks ; her hands were clasped before 
her, and her small white face had a strained, 
hunted look on it that was pitiful to see. 

' If you'd take my advice, ma'am, you 
wouldn't stand it a day longer. You'd go back 
to your mamma. There are lawyers enough in 
London who'd take it up, an' see you had your 
rights.' 



DORA RUNS AWAY 69 

* You mean I ought to see a lawyer about 
Edith V Dora said eagerly. ' Of course I ought 
to see a lawyer ! I can do nothing here. Oh ! 
Parker, do you think we could get away V 

Parker nodded. She could scarcely trust 
herself to speak. 

' He would never hear of it. I'm sure he 
would not hear of it.' 

' I shouldn't ask him,' Parker said grimly. 

' He would kill me if I were to go away with- 
out tellino^ him : I should never dare to come 
back. If you had seen his eyes, Parker, you 
wouldn't wonder that I dared not do anything 
to anger him ' 

' That's just where you are wrong, ma'am, 
begging your pardon ; you are too much afraid 
of him. You haven't any spirit of your own.' 

Dora sighed. 

' Oh, you don't know ! you don't know !' 
she moaned, wringing her hands. 

' I onlv know this,' Parker said in a most 
unfeeling way, ' that if you sit here all day 



70 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

weeping and moaning, that won't get Miss 
Edith out of prison/ 

To this Dora could make no reply ; but a 
swift glance of intelligence — of hope or fear — 
passed between her and her faithful serving- 
woman, and Parker nodded her head, and 
went quickly out of the room muttering to 
herself. 

When, two hours later, Captain Tremlett had 
ridden off on his gray mare, the carriage was 
brought round for Dora to take her usual after- 
noon drive. She did not go alone to-day. 
Parker was ready dressed when she came down 
the hotel stairs, and some luggage was already 
on the top of the carriage. 

' What does it mean ? where are we going V 
Dora asked helplessly. 

* It means that you are going up to town to 
release Miss Edith,' Parker said promptly. 

^ But I have not told Captain Tremlett that 
I am going ; I have left no message,' Dora said 
in a voice of dismay ; but she got into the 



DORA RUNS AWAY 71 

carriage, nevertheless, and at a sign from 
Parker it was rapidly driven away. 

'You can send a telegram from the station — 
there will be plenty of time to send a telegram ; 
and you can write when you get up to town.' 

' When I get up to town V 

Dora suffered herself to be driven to the 
station, and to be put into a carriage. She did 
not make any resistance ; she was more anxious 
to get away beyond the reach of her husband 
than Parker was to carry her off ; but she did 
not give ex23ression to her feelings. 

She sat silent in the corner of the railway 
carriage watching the fields flit by — the green 
fields, and the long lines of gray stone hedges 
dividing them — the cattle grazing — the white 
cottages with the smoke curling wp into 
the blue, and the rooks cawing in the tree- 
tops. 

She was too full of her own thoughts to see 
these familiar things, though she was watching 
them with her sad, anxious eyes. Her mind 



72 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

was far away ; visions of the happy past, of 
the sorrowful, terrible present, of the dark, 
doubtful future, rose before her. She could 
not realize that she was going home, that in a 
few hours she would have her mother's arms 
once again around her. She was filled with a 
fearful dread of her husband's anger when he 
should discover that she was gone — a dread that 
amounted almost to panic. She would have 
got out at the first station and gone back by 
the next train if Parker had let her. She had 
the greatest difficulty all through that miser- 
able journey up to town to keep her from 
going back. 

If she had not kept reminding her mistress 
that it was for Edith's sake that she had under- 
taken the journey, she would have gone back 
at least a dozen times on the way. 

' We shall be too late to set her free to- 
night,' Dora said, as she sat there with her 
white face pressed against the window-pane,^ 
trembling and irresolute. 



DORA RUNS AWAY 73 

' You can see the lawyers to-night,' Parker 
said encouragingly. ' I don't know that I 
won't see the lawyers myself.' 

' You ! what could you want to see them 
for V her mistress asked. 

' I don't know. Perhaps I might be able to 
throw some light on it. The detectives are 
not half sharp enough. They should employ 
women. Women are ever so much sharper 
than men in finding out things ; they can 
put two and two together better. I'd rather 
take a woman's opinion than a man's. There 
wouldn't be so many mistakes made if they 
employed women. A woman would never have 
thought of Miss Edith ; she'd have thought of 
everybody else before she'd have thought of her.' 

Dora was interested, and she looked round 
quickly ; she had been watching the long gray 
fields slipping by, and the telegraph-posts, and 
wonderino- if her husband had come back from 
his ride — if he had o-ot her messao^e — if he had 
started in pursuit of her. 



74 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

' I — I don't know that I ought to mention it, 
but when innocent folks are accused, it is time 
to speak. You mustn't attach any importance 
to what I'm going to say, Miss Dora ; there 
mayn't be anything in it : most hkely there's 
not. T shouldn't have breathed a word if Miss 
Edith hadn't been took to prison.' 

' But you were away when the loss of the 
necklace was discovered, Parker ; how can you 
know anything about it ?' her mistress asked in 
her sad, hopeless voice. 

' It's only what I think, and I've thought a 
good deal about it since ; perhaps I ought not 
to speak — there mayn't be anything in it.' 

' I think if you suspect anyone, if you can 
throw any light upon the dreadful affair, you 
ought not to let an innocent person suffer a 
single moment,' Dora said with a sob. 

* It was about the keys I was thinking,' 
Parker said, dropping her voice to a confiden- 
tial whisper — ' the keys of the iron safe in my 
mistress's dressing-room. Do you happen to 



DORA RUNS AWAY ' 75 

remember who brought them into her room the 
night before the wedding, when your mamma 
was in bed ?' 

' Edith stayed behind to lock the safe, after 
we had put the presents in, while I went to 
mamma's room to wish her good-night — it was 
our last good-night — but she did not bring the 
keys in The new maid was waiting at the 
door with them when I went out. She had 
waited outside until I had said good- night to 
mamma. I was in the room a lono- time, I 
remember, and I was crying when I came out.' 

' And she had been standinor- outside the 
door with the keys all the time V 

' I suppose so. She was standing there 
when I went out.' 

' And you were in with your mamma ten 
minutes V 

' I was in with her lono^er. I cannot sav how 
long — it was so hard to tear myself away, to 
feel it was the last time — it might have been 
half an hour.' 



^6 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

' And Patience was waiting outside with the 
keys all the time ?' 

' I suppose so ; she was there when I came 
out.' 

^ Then, it seems to me she had a better 
chance of taking the necklace than anyone 
else.' 

' Patience ! Oh, Parker !' 

' I don't say s she's got it, ma'am ; but she 
had a better chance of getting it than anyone 
else. I shouldn't have thought so much of 
it if there hadn't been other things. There 
was a tale about her, I heard, when she came. 
She told me it herself. She had left her last 
place, and had come to live down in the country, 
to get away from a man. He wouldn't give 
her any peace in town, and she had come away 
to escape from him. She was praying he 
mightn't find her out. But he had found her 
out, and he had followed her down to Nunwell. 
A strange man was seen hanging about the 
place for a week before the wedding, and I 



DORA RUNS AWAY 77 

heard that they had been seen in the shrubbery 
together after nightfall.' 

* How do you know it was the same man, 
Parker ?' 

* I heard all about it from Grason, the house- 
maid. She was in the servants' -hall one day 
when a man who was working at Fryston came 
over with a message for the Captain ; it was 
while he was staying at Nunwell. While the 
man was waiting in the hall having some lunch, 
Patience came in with a bowl of flowers in her 
hands to change the water. When she saw the 
man sitting at the table, she dropped down in 
a dead faint, and the bowl was smashed to 
pieces on the floor. It was the old Worcester 
bowl in the drawing-room that your mamma 
set so much store by.' 

' Poor thing ! what did she do when she came 
to herself?' Dora said. 

' The man took himself ofi* before she came 
to, but she let fall some words as she was 
coming to herself that showed he was no 



78 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

stranger to her. I don't like to speak ill of 
anyone, but I've my doubts about Patience. 
I wouldn't have breathed a word about them— 
there mayn't be anything in them after all — if 
it hadn't been for poor Miss Edith.' 

' I wonder what the man was to her, and 
why she was afraid of him,' Dora said thought- 
fully. She was thinking what she would have 
done if her husband had come upon her 
suddenly — whether she, too, would have fallen 
down in a heap upon the floor and shivered the 
Worcester bowl to atoms, as Patience had done. 



CHAPTER XIX. 



TO SAVE A SCANDAL. 



Doha was at home aor-ain at Numvell. Her 
mother had taken her back with her. There 
was nothing to keep Mrs. Bellew in town after 
Edith's wedding. Nothing could be done until 
the trial, which would not come off for several 
weeks, and she wanted to be back in Hereford- 
shire. After what had happened in Lowndes 
Square, London had become hateful to her. 

Dora had seen the lawyer whom Captain 
Stanhope had engaged to defend Edith, the day 
after her arrival in London, and she had 
signified her willingness, her earnest desire, to 
withdraw the monstrous charge which she 



8o THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

understood had been made without her know- 
ledge in her name. As her husband's name 
was coupled with hers, and the diamonds 
stolen were heirlooms, it was not possible to act 
on her instructions alone. There was nothing 
to be done but to wait for the trial. 

Dora's maid Parker had also been inter- 
viewed, but the lawyer did not seem to attach 
any weight to her statement. He regarded it 
as servant's gossip. 

Dora had gone up to Nunwell under her 
mother's wing. She had not exactly run away 
from her husband, but there was a breach 
between them. Captain Tremlett had not 
forgiven her going up to town without his 
permission. He had not chosen to answer any 
of her letters, her humble little letters, and 
he had not followed her up to town as she 
had feared he would. He had considered him- 
self an injured parti, and he had indulged in a 
fit of the sulks. He was still in Chelten- 
ham, drinking deeply, and nursing his wrath. 



TO SAVE A SCANDAL Si 

when Dora went back to Nun well with her 
mother. 

The subject of her husband's cruelty, and his 
dreadful habits, had not been discussed openly 
between mother and daughter. There are 
some subjects upon which a wife must be silent. 
Mrs. Bellew was fully aware that Dora's 
marriage had been a mistake, that it was an ill- 
assorted union that could bring her nothing but 
misery in the future, without any special ex- 
planation of the exact nature of her unhappiness. 

Mrs. Bellew knew enough of the poor child's 
wretchedness without tearing her heart-strings 
by dwelling on the miserable details. She had 
seen Dora's swollen wrist, and the livid marks 
on her arm, and Parker had kept nothing back. 
She thought her mistress ought to know. It 
was time for someone to interfere. 

The poor mother had shaken her head when 
the indiofnant waitino'-maid had said that it 
was impossible that her dear little mistress 
co^ld return to her husband. 

VOL. II. 20 



82 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

' There is no help for her, Parker ; she must 
go back to hhn if he orders it. She must obej^ 
him, whatever happens. We can do nothing 
to help her.' 

^ Oh ! you don't know his cruelty, his wicked- 
ness — how he takes a delight in torturing her. 
If you knew what it was, ma'am, you would see 
that it was impossible. Miss Dora ought not to 
be allowed to return to him ; a sweet, pure- 
minded, gentle creature to live with such a man 
as that ! If she were my child, I'd rather see 
her dead in her coffin ; I'd thank God every day 
that she was dead, rather than see her living 
with that man !' 

Parker could not sjDeak more strongly. 

Mrs. Bellew could only moan and wring 
her hands. She could never, never forgive 
herself for bringing this dreadful doom upon 
her child ; but she was powerless to help her. 
This hideous mockery of a marriage — a mar- 
riage without any love to cement it^had only 
been brought about to satisfy her pride. She 



TO SAVE A SCANDAL 83 

had thought only of Dora's position — what a 
great thing it would be for her to be the head of 
the family ! She had considered nothing else. A 
marriage without love on either side ; two 
lives — such opposite lives — bound up together 1 
— Oh, it was horrible ! 

Regrets were useless now — were worse than 
useless. Heaven and earth could not help her; 
if her husband ordered her to return to him, 
return she must. She had no alternative. 

This was how her mother put it, though her 
heart was bursting with shame and agony. 

' We cannot take her away from him,' she 
said, * unless he renders it impossible for her to 
go back.' 

All this had been said in London, when 
Dora had first come back, and her mother had 
marked the change in her. The change was so 
great that it broke her down whenever she 
looked at her. 

All Dora's fresh, girlish brightness was gone, 
and there was a look of suffering and patience 



84 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

in her soft eyes that went to her mother's 
heart. ' It will be different,' she told herself, 
' when she gets back to Nunwell ; the associa- 
tions of her home will bring back her old self.' 

Before Dora had been at Nunwell a week, 
her husband came to claim her. 

He drove up to the house unexpectedly one 
misty November night, and his mother-in-law 
had to take him in. She had to make some 
show of welcome for Dora's sake. 

The poor lady did not know how to receive 
him. She was more distressed than Dora, who, 
under her mother's protecting wing, met her 
husband with some show of courage. 

* I did not think you would come so soon, 
Lionel,' she said, with an unusual flush on her 
pale cheeks, and a tremor of agitation in her 
voice and frame which he could not have helped 
remarking if he had had eyes for anything. 
' Fryston will not be ready for another fort- 
night ; we did not expect you until the work- 
people had gone.' 



TO SAVE A SCANDAL 85 

She did not say anything about her flight. 

Her Httle hands were trembling as he took 
them in his ; he must have felt how they trem- 
bled, how she shrank away from him. 

* It would never be ready unless I came down 
to hurry them on,' her lord said ungraciously. 
' I dare say you wouldn't have cared how long 
they were about it ; you are glad of an excuse 
to be here. For my part, I want to get into 
my own house.' 

' It is quite natural that she should wish to 
be here,' her mother said quickly. She was 
hurt, exasperated, and her feelings were scarcely 
under her own control. 

Her son-in-law did not choose to answer her. 
He had not come down to quarrel with her ; he 
had come down to take his wife away. He did 
not reproach Dora for running away, now that 
she was under her mother's roof ; he seemed to 
have forgotten it for the time, or was saving it 
up as the subject for a future complaint. He 
was gloomy and taciturn all through that first 



86 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

wretched dinner, and when it was over he took 
himself off to the biUiard-room to smoke for the 
rest of the evening. 

Mrs. Belle w lay awake all through that night 
listening, and she came down to the breakfast - 
table the next morning looking pale and hag- 
gard, after the anxiety and the bitter reflections 
that had robbed her of her rest. 

There were no screams to disturb her, no 
high voices raised in conjugal dispute, proceed- 
ing from behind that closed door. Whatever 
form the cruelty of Dora's husband had taken 
on that first night beneath her mother's roof, 
she had certainly not screamed, and fled to her 
in her terror for protection and help. 

Captain Tremlett rode over to Fryston after 
breakfast. He did not, according to his usual 
custom, sit drinking till noon ; he started quite 
early for Fryston, to make preparations, as he 
told Dora, for returning home ; he was not 
going to be kept out of the house a day longer. 

He did not return to Nunwell until late in 



TO SAVE A SCANDAL 87 

the evening, until the preparations were com- 
pleted, when he returned to fetch Dora home. 
He had brouo-ht a carriao^e with him — one of 
the carriages from Fryston — and a groom with 
the Tremlett livery was on the box. He had 
come to fetch his wife ; he would not wait for 
dinner — dinner was waiting^ for them when 
they got back, he said ; he had come to take 
Dora away at once. 

' But surely the place cannot have been got 
ready in this short time !' his mother-in-law 
urged tremblingly. She did not know w^hat 
she feared. 

' It is as ready as it's likely to be for some 
time,' he answered surlily. ' If I can put up 
with it, I suppose my wife can.' 

She did not know what to say ; she could 
not urge any plea to hold her daughter back. 
It was clearly Dora's duty to obey her husband, 
to follow him to the end of the world, if need 
be. 

' I wouldn't let her go with him to-night, 



88 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

ma'am, for all the world !' Parker said when she 
pfot her mistress alone. * I don't like the look 
in his eyes. The j^lace isn't ready for her — it 
isn't fit for her to go into ; and the servants 
have not come down. He may murder her in 
the night in one of his fits, and there'd be 
nobody near to call.' 

This was not very reassuring. 

' Whatever happens, I can't keep her back,' 
the poor lady said, wringing her hands. 

Dora was not so disturbed in appearance as 
her mother. She had put on a brave front for 
her mother's sake ; she would not for the world 
have let her see how frightened and reluctant 
she was. 

' I shall come over and see you to-morrow, 
mamma,' she said, trying to keep the quiver out 
of her voice, as she stood in the hall wishing her 
good-bye. ' We are so near, it will be nothing to 
run over ; we shall see each other often now.' 

Mrs. Bellew took her child in her arms and 
strained her with a sudden fear to her bosom. 



TO SAVE A SCANDAL 89 

* Good-bye, my darling, good-bye ; if — if you 
should want me — if it is more than you can 
bear — let Parker ' 

She could not finish the sentence ; Captain 
Tremlett was waitinof for Dora outside, and he 
was calling to her, as he had called to her on 
his wedding-day : 

' Are you ready ? Are you coming ? Do 
you know the horses are waiting V 

It was a raw, foggy November night, and 
when Dora stepped across the threshold the 
damp mist seemed to swallow her up. 

Mrs. Bellew could not see the carriage -lamps 
as they plunged into the mist, but she heard 
the sound of the horses' hoofs on the ofravel, as 
they died away in the distance, with a dreadful 
sinking of heart, and then she went back to her 
desolate hearth to weep and bemoan her folly. 
It was her wicked ambition, she told herself, 
that had brought this misery on her child. 
She had sold her child for rank and position. 
She had not thought of her happiness ; it had 



90 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

not been taken into account. It had been all 
arranged for her ; Dora had had no voice in the 
matter, except those few broken, inarticulate 
words she had breathed at the altar, when the 
rain was falling on the chancel roof 

Dora did not come back the next day, but a 
letter was brought over from Parker to her 
mistress by one of the workmen employed at 
Fryston after he left work. It was the man 
who had frightened Patience out of her wits the 
day that she broke the Worcester bowl. 

She had recovered from her fright now ; he 
no longer frightened her out of her wits. 
While her mistress was reading the letter he 
had brought over, she was walking with him in 
the shrubbery. It was late for a girl to be out 
on these misty November nights in a dark wood 
with a strange man ; there was not another 
maid at Nun well who would have stayed out so 
late, and strayed so far from the house at such 
an hour. When her mistress rang for Patience 
an hour later, she had not come in, and when 



TO SAVE A SCANDAL 91 

she did come in she was white and trembling, 
and not fit for anything. 

Mrs. Bellew did not notice the girl's pale face 
and her strange manner ; she had other things 
to think of The letter from Parker had filled 
her with vao^ue alarms. Dora had not been 
taken to Fryston. She had been taken to a 
lodge, which had been hurriedly prepared for 
her, at the farther extremity of the estate. It 
was only a keeper's lodge, and there was no 
proper accommodation ; it was not at all a 
fit place for her. Parker wrote only a brief note 
speaking of the discomfort and the lack of 
attendance, and the unsuitability of the place ; 
but she did not say anything about her little 
mistress or her husband. It was a cautious 
letter, and it was sent in a clandestine way. 
Mrs. Bellew, reading between the lines, arrived 
at the conviction that Parker, the brave Parker, 
was writing in fear ; that she dared not express 
herself more plainly lest her letter should mis- 
carry, and fall into hands it was not intended for. 



92 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

Mrs. Bellew was not only angry and indignant, 
she was sick with terror ; she dared not trust 
herself to think what might happen to her child 
in that lonely lodge, with no one near to appeal 
to for help. She lay awake all night worrying 
and wearying, and full of vain reproaches. 

Her sorrow and regret seemed to mock her, 
they had come so late. If only she could have 
foreseen in time ! 

As early as she dared to go, Mrs. Bellew 
drove over to the lodge where Dora had been 
carried. It was on the other side of the park, 
in a damp, unhealthy situation, with undrained 
land around it, and a dense fir-copse rising up 
behind. It was not at all the place for a deli- 
cately-nurtured woman ; it was the essence of 
cruelty or thoughtlessness to have brought 
Dora there. It was a chilly November day 
when Mrs. Bellew drove over, and a raw mist 
hung over the wet fields, and the yellow autumn 
leaves were falling thickly on the ground, and 
the songs of the birds were hushed. 



TO SAVE A SCANDAL 93 

She found Dora in the Uttle bare sitting- 
room of the lodge, shivering over an unwilling 
fire. She was sitting very close to the fire, 
with her hands on her lap. She was not read- 
ing or working ; there were no books or papers 
in her prison. She had come away in a hurry 
— she had brouo-ht nothino^ with her — and she 
was here, in this desolate place, with nothing 
to do. 

Dora jumped up when her mother came into 
the room, and threw her arms around her. 
Her eyes were red, as if from weeping, and for 
the moment, in the surprise and joy of seeing 
her mother, she lost command of herself and 
clung to her with a wild energy that told its 
own tale. 

' My darling, my darling !' the poor mother 
faltered ; and then, in spite of all her brave 
resolutions on the way, she broke down. ' I 
did not think it was so bad as this. I had no 
idea he was going to bring you to such a place, 
or I should not have let you go,' she said 



94 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

indignantly, when she could say anything 
at all. 

' Oh, this is nothing, mamma, if it were only 
this !' the poor child sobbed ; she had lost con- 
trol of herself, and was weeping in her mother's 
arms. ' I could put up with this ; it will only 
be for another week, and then the house will 
be ready.' 

' Captain Tremlett ought never to have 
brought you here ; a week in this place will 
kill you. You must go back with me, Dora.' 

Dora shook her head. 

' I could not go away without — without 
Lionel's consent, mamma,' she said with a sigh. 
' I must not set myself up against him again ; it 
— it is only far worse for me. I must bear it — 
I must learn to bear it. It will not be long 
before we go to Fryston, and then I shall have 
another room to go to. I shall be able to get 
away from — the sight — and the sound ' 

Dora shuddered; she could not help shudder- 
ing when she recalled what she had gone 



TO SAVE A SCANDAL 95 

throuo4i in that room, and a blush of shame 
dyed her cheeks. She could not speak of these 
thinofs to her mother without shame and con- 
fusion. She withdrew herself out of her tender, 
clinging arms, and dried her tears. She had 
remembered what for a moment she had 
forgotten — her wifely duty to suffer and be 
silent. 

' My poor love !' her mother cried, half weep- 
ing, half angry. ' You cannot, you shall not 
stay here to bear this. He ought not to expect 
you. I will wait and see your husband, and 
reason with him. What would people say if 
they knew he had brought you here V 

Dora smiled — a faint little smile. 

' I don't think he would mind that, mamma ; 
he — he is past that. I don't think anything 
you can do, anything anyone can do or say, will 
avail ; it will only make things worse. I have 
found out that it is better to be patient and 
bear it.' 

This was all Mrs. Bellew could get from her ; 



96 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

it was better to bear it than to complain. 
Complaint and interference only brought her 
more suffering. It was better to put up with 
the horror and the wickedness — to put up with 
it and ignore it — than to complain. 

The poor mother went away heart-broken ; 
but before she went away she saw Parker alone 
for a few minutes. 

* He is just awful/ she said in a whisper to 
her mistress, when she got her outside the 
door, before the carriage came up ; 'he ought to 
be put in an asylum, and locked up ; he is more 
like a wild beast than a man. He keeps her a 
prisoner here all day, and won't let her go out 
of his sight. There'll be something dreadful 
happen if someone doesn't interfere.' 

There was no one that Mrs. Belle w could 
apply to for help in her trouble without making 
her daughter's wrongs the theme of every idle 
tongue, and creating a scandal in the neigh- 
bourhood. There was only Sir Bourchier who 
could interfere, and, at the risk of making a 



TO SAVE A SCANDAL 97 

division in the family, she wrote to Sir Bourchier 
when she got back. She would have gone to 
him if she could, but she dared not leave Dora, 
even for a day, without heljD at hand. She did 
not tell Sir Bourchier the whole truth, but she 
implied that he had not been quite frank with 
her at the time of the marriage. He knew, or 
he ought to have known, something of his son's 
habits, and he had kept the knowledge to him- 
self She implored him to interfere and save 
her child. 

Sir Bourchier Tremlett was an old man ; 
he was now in his second childhood. He had 
married late in life, and his son, with his 
gloomy ways and his violent habits, had been 
a great trouble to him. He was just now con- 
gratulating himself upon having got him safely 
married, upon the trouble being shifted to 
another pair of shoulders ; he had only now 
settled comfortably down into the slumbrous 
apathy of old age — when the dream was 
suddenly broken in upon by Mrs. Bellew's 

VOL. II. 21 



98 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

letter. It was a troublesome matter ; it was 
not really his business ; Mrs. Bellew had given 
her daughter to his son with her eyes open. 
Hundreds of mothers would be glad to have 
the chance she had had ; hundreds of girls 
would have married him, and — kept silence. 
There are always two sides to a bargain ; one 
can't have everything, and Dora had got all 
she had bargained for. She was the head of 
the family, and very soon she would be Lady 
Tremlett ; she had nothing to complain of. 
He did not, considering all this, feel at all 
inclined to interfere. He would not have 
interfered if Ermyntrude, the eldest of his 
elderly daughters, had not suggested that 
Lionel and his bride should be invited to stay 
at Castle Hill until Fryston was ready for 
them ; it would be better to put up with any 
inconvenience in order to save a scandal. 



CHAPTER XX. 

CASTLE HILL. 

The immediate fruit of Mrs. Bellew's inter- 
ference was the visit of Dora and her husband 
to Castle Hill. He would surely be better, she 
told herself, in his father's house. Among his 
own friends, with so many prying eyes about, 
be would not dare to ill-treat his wife ; and he 
would not be able to indulge in his horrible 
habits. Surely there, if anywhere, he would be 
under some feeling of restraint. 

^ I think it is the best thino^ that could 
happen,' her mother said as she wished Dora 
good-bye. ' You Avill have his father and his 
sisters to fall back upon — if — if you need them. ' 



100 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

She did not speak very hopefully. 

'I don't know, mamma; I don't thmk any- 
thing will make any difference,' Dora said with 
a sigh. ' But you must not worry yourself 
about me. I am getting used to it ; I am 
braver than I used to be.' 

Her lips were quivering, she could not keep 
back the tears from her eyes, though she 
strove to speak cheerfully ; then the carriage 
drove off, and Mrs. Bellew, looking after it 
through her tears, saw her small white face at 
the window trying to screw up a wan reassuring 
smile. 

There was some truth in what Dora had said 
to her mother in parting ; nothing seemed to 
make any difference. Within a week she was 
back again at the keeper's lodge. She had 
come back in a hurry without any warning. 
Something had happened at Castle Hill, and 
Captain Tremlett had brought back his bride 
the next day. 

There had been a scene, a distinct scene, 



CASTLE HILL loi 

beneath Ins father's roof, and he had hurried 
his bride away to escape the consequences. 

The occasion for scandal Miss Ermyntrude was 
anxious to avoid had occurred during the brief 
stay of her brother and his bride at Castle 
Hill. The household had been aroused in the 
night by a sound of high voices and h3'Sterical 
weeping in the room occupied by Captain 
Tremlett and his wife, and Dora had burst out 
of the room and fled screaming down the dark 
corridor, pursued by the infuriated bridegroom ; 
she had souor-ht refuor-e from his violence in 
her sister-in-law's room. There had been no 
explanation given of this shameful scene, and 
the head of the family had departed betimes the 
next morning, taking his wife with him. 

The first intimation Mrs. Belle w had of her 
daughter's return was a hurried note she 
received from Parker the following day. It 
reached her quite early in the day, while she was 
dressing; it had been brought over by one of the 
men employed at Fryston, on his way to work. 



102 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

Parker implored her mistress to come at 
once ; but she did not say what had happened. 
It could not be anything very serious, she 
reasoned with herself, as she hurriedly put on 
her bonnet. Her fingers were trembling so, that 
she could not tie the strings, and her maid had 
to come to her aid. She had slipped out of the 
room while her mistress was reading the letter, 
and she had had a few hurried words with the 
messenger. 

^ I don't think I'd go alone, ma'am,' the girl 
said nervously, when she had fastened on her 
wraps, and had persuaded her mistress to drink 
a cup of tea before she started ; ' it mightn't be 
safe for you to go alone. If the Captain's 
broken out, there's no saying what he'll do. It 
would be safer to take Williams.' 

Williams was the indoor servant who acted 
as butler ; being single-handed, he could not 
often be spared to go with the carriage in the 
morning. 

' Broken out !' Mrs. Bellew had heard the 



CASTLE HILL 103 

words before, applied to drunken vagabonds in 
the village who beat their wives ; but to apply 
them to Dora's husband ! Besides, what could 
this girl know about him ? Patience reddened 
furiously when questioned ; she did not mean 
anything, but she thought it would be safer if 
her mistress would take Williams. 

When the carriage reached the lonely lodge 
at the edge of the wood it was still quite early. 
The white mists were lying still on the 
undrained water meadows, but the sun was 
shining above the tree-tops, where the rooks 
were still cawing. It was so early that they 
had not yet started on their business for the 
day. The anxious mother, looking eagerly from 
the carriage-window, saw the feeble thread of 
white smoke curling up above the trees from 
the low chimney of the lodge long before the 
house was in sight. The sombre pine-wood rose 
behind it, and the melancholy gray mists lying 
about the park seemed to swallow it up. It did 
not seem possible that Dora could be there. 



104 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

Before the carriage reached the lodge it drew 
up suddenly. The coachman had stopped in 
obedience to a signal from someone walking in 
the road. It was Parker, coming towards it in 
haste, and Williams — he had come with the 
carriage, after all — had jumped off the box 
to open the door for her to speak to his 
mistress. 

She had a shawl thrown over her head, and 
was breathless with running when she reached 
the carriage-door. 

'Go back,' she cried, 'go back! You must 
not be seen so near the house. He is watching 
for you ; I don't know what will happen if he 
sees you. You must wait at the bend of the 
road, out of sight of the windows of the lodge.' 

The coachman had caught her words, and he 
turned round and drove quietly back to the 
place she indicated. It was strange how the 
servants seemed to understand ; they knew all 
about it. Williams let down the steps of the 
carriage for Parker to get in and speak to her 



CASTLE HILL 105 

mistress, and when she was in he closed the 
door upon her, and discreetly turned his atten- 
tion to the misty landscape. 

' He has broken out,' Parker said under her 
breath ; ' he has been raving like a madman all 
the nicrht ; if we had not taken the knives 
away, he would have murdered her.' 

' My poor child ! my poor child !' was all the 
distracted mother could say. 

' You must take her away ; you must not let 
her stay with him a single day longer. Another 
night, and it will be too late. Oh, you don't 
know what we have gone through the last two 
nights ; only a few frightened women alone 
with a madman !' 

' Where is she ? You have not left her 
alone with him?' Mrs. Bellew cried, jumping 
up. She wanted to go to Dora's aid at once, 
but Parker detained her. 

* He is asleep now, downstairs, and I have 
locked her in her room and brouor-ht aAvav the 
key. If you come to her you must come softly, 



io6 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

without beinc^ seen ; he must not know that 
you are here.' 

Mrs. Bellew followed Dora's faithful hand- 
maid silently through the w^et lane — her heart 
was too full to speak ; and Williams, at a sign 
from Parker, dropped down on the other side of 
the hedge, and was lost to sight. 

Parker led the way into the lodge, pausing in 
the narrow entry to point a warning finger at 
the closed door behind which the master of the 
house was sleeping. Mrs. Bellew could hear 
him breathing heavily, and muttering in his 
drunken sleep, as she stood on the threshold. 
She turned away with a shudder, and followed 
Parker softly up the stairs. 

The room that she led her into was the 
principal room of the lodge, and looked out over 
the park. 

It was in a strange state of confusion when 
Mrs. Bellew went in. Everything was upset ; 
the furniture was tln'own about, as if there had 
been a struggle, and a mirror above the mantel- 



CASTLE HILL 107 

piece was smashed. For the first few seconds 
after she had entered the room, and Parker had 
locked the door behind her, she did not see 
Dora. She had not come forward to meet her 
as she was wont to do; she could not have come 
forward if she would. She was crouched up in 
a large chair beside the bed, with her arm in a 
kind of sling, and a handkerchief steeped in 
eau-de-Cologne tied round her head ; her face 
was white and drawn. It did not look like 
the same Dora. 

Mrs. Bellew flew to her side with a startled 
cry — she could not help the cry escaping her — 
and took the poor little martyr in her arms. 

' My love ! oh, my love !' was all the fright- 
ened mother could say. 

Dora could only moan in reply ; she was past 
weeping, and she let her head fall on her 
mother's shoulder. 

* What has happened ? He — he surely has 
not — struck you V Mrs. Bellew gasped. 

There was a livid mark on the girl's cheek, 



io8 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

beneath that wet bandage, and she could not 
move her arm. 

' It is nothing, mamma,' she said, trying to 
keep the pain out of her voice. ' I — I have 
strained my shoulder ; Lionel was excited last 
night ; he did not know what he was doing, and 
— and I struggled with him, and strained my 
shoulder ; it is not much.' 

Parker tossed her head. She had no patience 
with her mistress trying to cover up her 
husband's violence. 

' It has made you look very pale,' her mother 
said, trying to speak calmly ; * perhaps it is more 
than you think. You ought to have it ex- 
amined. And that mark on your face — did you 
get that in the — the struggle V 

' I did not know there was a mark,' Dora said, 
a faint colour coming into her pale cheeks. 'I 
have got a headache with staying up all night, 
and Parker has put on some eau-de-Cologne.' 

' That does not account for the mark,' her 
mother said with tightening lips. She was 



CASTLE HILL 109 

striving hard to keep her composure, not to let 
her indignation get the better of her — to think 
what to do for the best. It was so hard to 
keep cahn with the spectacle of that bruised face 
and the disabled shoulder before her. 

* I may have hurt myself in struggling ; it is 
only a bruise ; I did not feel it at the time. It 
is nothing to speak of, mamma.' 

' Why were you struggling with your 
husband V her mother asked severely. She 
took no notice of that explanation of the bruise. 

Dora hung her head, and did not make any 
reply at first. She was very calm, not excited 
at all ; perhaps the excitement had worn off. 

' Lionel had been drinking late, and he did 
not know what he was doing ; he was not quite 
himself. He thought there were some evil 
things in the room, and he was defending him- 
self against them. He broke the mirror because 
he saw his own reflection in it. We had to 
struggle with him, Parker and I, to keep him 
from doing himself or others an injury. There 



no THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

were no men here to restrain him, and he was 
more violent than usual.' 

' He was mad — quite mad with drink and 
delirium/ Parker said shortly ; ' he was not 
accountable for what he was doinof. If I 
hadn't come in when I did, he would have 
killed her. He was kneeling on her chest, and 
when I took her away from him, he nearly 
wrenched her arm off. I believe he's torn all 
the muscles of her shoulder.' 

' Oh, my poor darling !' her mother moaned, 
kneeling down beside her chair, and taking 
Dora's thin little hand in hers ; she had not 
remarked before how thin it had grown. ' You 
must come back with me now, Dora. I shall 
not go away and leave you in the power of 
that wicked man again. It is no longer your 
duty to stay with him. He has outraged all 
laws of humanity and decency. You must 
come back to Nunwell with me, and let him 
come after you and claim you if he dare !' 

Mrs. Bellew was fully roused now. She was 



CASTLE HILL in 

like a lioness defending her cub — her little 
wounded cub ; the maternal instinct of defence 
and protection was fully roused. 

* I cannot go away. I cannot leave him — he 
is my husband still — until there is someone 
here to look after him. He does not know 
what he is doing. When he awakes he may be 
violent again ; he may do himself some injury 
if no one is near to prevent it.' 

Parker shrugged her shoulders impatiently. 
She had no sympathy with her mistress's 
scruples. She would not have been much 
moved if he had done himself an injury — him- 
self, and no other. 

' I will send Dale over ' — Dale was Mrs. 
Bellew's own medical attendant — ' and I will 
telegraph to Sir Bourchier. When he is in 
this state he ought to have his own people 
about him,' her mother said in a tone of con- 
viction. ' They must have seen this sort of 
thing before, and they know what to do. Sir 
Bourchier must send someone to look after him.* 



112 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

Still, Dora was not to be persuaded to leave 
her husband. 

* When Dr. Dale comes, I will be guided by 
what he says, mamma. If you knew the state 
he was in, you would not ask me to leave him.' 

Nothinof would shake her resolution ; she 
would not fail in her duty to the miserable 
wretch below. She was deaf to her mother's 
prayers and tears, and Mrs. Bellew had to go 
away and leave her with the bandage round 
her head in that locked room. She left 
Williams behind, in case he might be wanted, 
and she drove off in haste to summon Dr. Dale, 
and to communicate with Sir Bourchier. 

It was impossible to keep the secret any 
longer ; everybody would know it sooner or 
later ; there was no longer any possibility of 
avoiding a scandal. 

Dr. Dale had to be told. Certain explana- 
tions had to be entered into. It is always best 
to be frank with one's medical adviser ; Mrs. 
Eellew could not have concealed anything from 



CASTLE HILL 113 

him if she had desired. He had been called 
in to see two patients, and Dora's wounded 
arm and bruised cheek had to be accounted for. 

He did not arrive at the North Lodge a 
moment too soon. Captain Tremlett had awoke 
out of his drunken sleep, and there had been 
another scene of violence. He had tried to 
break open that locked door behind which his 
wife was hidden, and he would have succeeded 
if Williams had not been there to get him 
away. Williams was with him in the room 
below when the doctor arrived. They could 
hear him raving and cursing within when 
the carriage stopped before the door of the 
lodge. 

The doctor came away from the interview 
with a grave face. 

' It is not safe for him to be left with women,' 
he said ; ' when the paroxysm is upon him he 
has the strength of ten men, and he is not 
answerable for anything he may do. There 
are some grooms here, and Williams, who will 

VOL. II. - 22 



114 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

remain until proper attendants can be sent for. 
His wife can do no good by remaining.' 

Still, Dora was unwilling to leave her hus- 
band. 

' I knew he was not in his right mind,' she 
pleaded ; ' he would not have done it if he had 
been in his right mind.' 

She was in a weak, exhausted state, and the 
shoulder was much inflamed ; all the muscles 
seemed to be torn away. She would want 
nursing and care for weel^s. 

She went away with them at last ; if it had 
not been for the agony in her shoulder, and her 
helplessness, she would not have gone then. 
Before she went, she said a few words to her 
husband. She would not go without seeing 
him first, without telling him that she was 
going. She was glad to remember afterwards 
that she had spoken to him. 

' I am going to Nunwell with mamma for a 
few days, Lionel,' she said tremulously, coming 
over to the couch on which he was lying. He 



CASTLE HILL 115 

was lying back on the couch, with his eyes 
closed, breathing heavily, and his face was 
deeply flushed. ' I could not go away without 
saying good-bye.' 

She was bending over him ; she thought he 
was sleeping, but perhaps the sense of her 
words might reach him. In a moment he had 
sprung up, and seized her by the shoulder — the 
poor wounded shoulder — and was holding her 
in his iron grip. 

* Going away V he repeated — ' going away T 
The men came between them, and separated 
them ; they did not know what injury he would 
do her. They had not interfered a moment too 
soon ; she sank insensible into the arms of the 
man who released her. The pain in her 
shoulder had been more than she could bear, 
and she had fainted. 



CHAPTER XXI. 

TREMLETT V, STANHOPE. 

Edith Stanhope's trial at the Central Criminal 
Court came on for hearing in December. Her 
husband had broken it to her by degrees, that 
she would have to appear again to answer to 
the shameful charge. It was not all over yet ; 
the worst had to come. She was not afraid of 
the worst now, if he were beside her to face it 
with her. 

Captain Stanhope had expected until the last 
moment that the case would be withdrawn ; he 
could not believe that any man in his senses 
would go on with it. Up to the eve of the 
dreaded day when Edith was to surrender to 



TREMLETT v. STANHOPE 117 

her bail it had not been withdrawn. Dora had 
used every argument to induce the lawyers to 
throw up their briefs, but without avail. They 
would do nothing without her husband's 
instructions, and Captain Trenilett was not in a 
state to give instructions. He was shut up in 
one of the newly-decorated rooms at Fryston 
with a keeper. If he were not exactly mad, he 
was under restraint. It had been found 
necessary to put him under restraint after that 
attack of mania at the lodge. Any other man 
would have been put in an asylum ; but the 
owner of Fryston was suffered to live in his own 
house in the charge of keepers. A certain 
latitude was allowed him in his intervals of 
reason, but to all intents and purposes he was 
treated as a madman : he was not allowed to 
stir a foot without a keeper. 

Dora and her mother had come up to Lowndes 
Square for the trial. She had not returned to 
her husband's roof since that dreadful day when 
she had parted with him at the keeper's lodge. 



ii8 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

She had been weak and ill ever since ; her 
nervous system had sustained a shock ; she 
was not fit to go back and go through it all 
again. 

* When the trial is over I shall go back to 
Fryston,' she said to her mother when they 
were coming up to town. ' A wife's place is 
with her husband ; if he is ill, whether in body 
or mind, there is all the more reason why she 
should be with him. I don't think I ought 
to have stayed away so long.' 

Mrs. Bellew did not dissuade her ; it would 
be time to reason with her when the trial was 
over. Her anxiety just now was for Edith. 
From what she had heard, she was afraid the 
trial would go against her. 

She could not think what would happen if the 
jury were to find Edith guilty. There was no 
saying what evidence would be brought against 
her, and she had no means of disproving it ; 
she was relying alone upon her innocence. 

Edith had only come back from her honey- 



TREMLETT r. STANHOPE 119 

moon at the last moment. She had been re- 
luctant to bring the happy days to a close 
— to cloud them with this dark shadow that 
was hanging over her. She could not give 
up a single happy hour ; she wanted to wring 
every drop of joy out of the cup before she gave 
it out of her hands. It was only this unwilling- 
ness to yield one jot or tittle of her happiness 
that held her back, that kept her from coming up 
to town to ' prepare her case ' before the inevit- 
able hour. Her aunt, Miss Gunning, had been ill 
during her absence — she had not been expected 
to live day by day — but the tidings had not 
hurried her back. The old woman had never 
been much to her ; and she had her own life to 
live. She could not have spared an hour of the 
present for all the great-aunts in the world. 

The dreaded day arrived at last. It could 
be put oif no longer. It seemed to Edith, 
who had lain awake all night watching for it, 
that she had been expecting it, waiting for 
it, all her life. It was a sad, gray December 



I20 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

morning, with a shivering, wet wind sighing 
through the murky streets — a chill, depressing 
day, without light or heat. It was so dark 
when Edith was brought into the court that 
for the first few minutes she could not dis- 
tinguish anything clearly. She saw dimly, in 
the dull December light that came through 
the high windows, the grave faces of her 
accusers. 

The court was crowded. It seemed to her, 
standing at the bar, that it was paved from 
floor to roof with human faces — hard, in- 
different faces. She could not see in one of 
them, in that hasty glance round the crowded 
court, the faintest show of sympathy. She 
did not expect sympathy ; she did not know 
why she looked for it. 

There were some formalities to go through 
which she did not understand at all ; and some- 
one was speaking in the well of the court 
below : the counsel for the plaintiff was opening 
the case. 



TREMLETT v. STANHOPE 121 

She listened to him with a vague sense of 
wonder ; she could not help listening with 
strained attention to the dreadful tale he was 
telling. 

The defendant, Edith Stanhope, formerly 
Edith Darcy, was a personal friend of one of 
the plaintiffs, Mrs. Tremlett, and had acted as 
her bridesmaid on the day that the diamond 
necklet in question was missed. It was alleged 
that the necklet had been last seen in her pos- 
session, that she alone had had access to it, 
and that after it was missed it had been traced 
to her possession. 

Edith turned round sharply when this state- 
ment was made, and glanced at her husband, 
and a flush of indignant scarlet came into her 
pale cheeks. 

Traced to her possession ! 

Captain Stanhope was standing next the 
dock ; he would have stood within it if he had 
been allowed. He smiled back reassuringly 
when Edith looked round. Of course they 



122 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

must have had some evidence, or supposed they 
had some, or they would not have ventured to 
bring this charge against her. 

The defendant, the learned counsel went on 
to say, had left Nunwell, the residence of the 
bride's mother, the day after the wedding. 
She had left by an early train. 

There were many trains from Hereford to 
London during the day, and she had gone by 
the first. She had stolen out of the house at 
daybreak, when all the household were asleep, 
and had left by the early train. There did not 
seem to be any reason for this secrecy and 
haste. She had no business to transact in 
London. She had gone straight through to 
St. Oswald's, and had reached her destination 
some hours earlier than she was expected. 

This was quite true, but Edith could not see 
what it had to do with the case. 

The lady's position at this time, he went on 
to say, was peculiar. She was engaged to be 
married. She had come up to town with the 



TREMLETT v. STANHOPE 123 

avowed intention of buying her wedding clothes. 
It would be shown that, if not at this time actu- 
ally in monetary difficulties, she was in great 
need of money. She was crippled in her re- 
sources. She did not know where to go for 
money to buy her wedding clothes. 

The angry flush deepened on Edith's face, 
and her dark eyes grew darker and brighter. 
What did the man mean by talking about these 
things in public ? What had her trousseau to 
do with all these people ? Why did not Derek 
stop him ? Surely he could stop him ! 

He smiled back at the mute appeal in her 
dark eyes, at the hot indignation in her beauti- 
ful face. His smile calmed her and reassured 
her, and she set herself again, with some show 
of patience, to listen to the charges they were 
bringing against her. 

She had no money on the 20th of September ; 
and on the 23rd she went up to town for the 
purpose of raising money. Her movements on 
that day had been traced. The jury would 



124 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

hear for themselves what had taken place on 
this particular day. The lady had come up to 
town without money, and during the day, be- 
fore she returned to St. Oswald's, she had pur- 
chased a great part of her trousseau, and had 
decided on certain articles of furniture. 

She had paid several visits to town on subse- 
quent occasions, and each time she had added 
to her trousseau, and spent considerable sums 
of money in furniture. He was prepared to 
show that the defendant had no money of her 
own to meet this outlay, and that she had not 
received any advance from her trustee. 

At this stage Edith looked round at her 
husband ; she did not meet his eyes eagerly 
as she had done before, but she raised them to 
his with a mute, deprecating appeal that went 
to his heart. He smiled back reassuringly ; 
nothing could shake his trust in her. 

Her pecuniary circumstances could not be 
too much dwelt upon, as they supplied the 
motive that was w^anting for the theft of the 



TREMLETT v, STANHOPE 125 

diamonds. These, and the great inducement 
there was in the prospect of her approaching 
marriage, and the desire to stand well with 
the fi'iends of her husband, who were opposed 
to the match, would furnish the motive for the 
act. 

Derek Stanhope did not know how he had 
patience to listen to the insolent insinuations 
of his wife's accuser. He could not trust him- 
self to look at her. He seemed wancing in 
fealty, to stand idly by and listen to these 
cruel imputations. 

It was perhaps quite as well that he had not 
looked round. He would have seen the dear 
face, that was strained in an attitude of eager 
attention, slowly whitening. 

He could not attach too much importance, 
the counsel went on to say, to these facts ; 
taken with other things, they proved strong 
collateral testimony in favour of the supposi- 
tion that the accused had stolen the necklace, 
and made away with it to supply her pressing, 



126 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

her urgently pressing needs. The onus would 
rest on the defendant's counsel to prove where, 
and by what means, she had raised the various 
sums of money with which she had paid for the 
articles purchased. 

Derek Stanhope looked round at his wife 
with an eager look of relief that there was no 
mistaking. Of course she would be able to 
explain all this. It was a cruel charge to be 
built on such a fabric ; but Edith did not look 
round. She kept her face averted ; he could 
only see the beautiful profile, with all the 
colour gone from it, and the lines set white 
and hard, like a face chiselled in marble. 
Having proved the circumstances that led to 
the commission of the felony, the counsel was 
prepared to trace home the possession of the 
necklace to the defendant, and to call witnesses 
who would identify her as having sought to 
dispose of it. 

At this stage of the proceedings there was a 
distinct sensation in the court ; people were 



TREMLETT v, STANHOPE 127 

pressing forward to get a better view of her 
face ; and some were putting their glasses to 
their eyes, and an audible murmur had risen 
which drowned the soft, slow utterance of the 
counsel who was speaking. 

Edith did not look at her husband ; she was 
looking straight before her. She saw then, for 
the first time — she had not looked that way 
before — two kind faces that were raised to hers 
at the table below, round which the lawyers 
were sitting ; two anxious faces, full of ten- 
derest sympathy. They were the faces of Dora 
and her mother. 

Hush! 

A silence had fallen on the crowded court, 
and everyone Avas listening eagerly — Edith 
more eagerly than they all. What was this 
that he was saying, the soft-spoken counsel for 
the plaintiff, with his hard face turned towards 
her, and his plausible voice compelling the 
attention of the jury ? 

He was speaking of diamonds that a woman 



128 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

— whom witnesses that he would presently 
bring forward would identify as the prisoner 
at the bar — had offered for sale ; diamonds of 
unusual brilliance and size, which had been 
hastily and unskilfully removed from their 
setting. 

He was prepared with a large body of evidence 
to prove the visit of the defendant to a firm in 
the City who dealt in these things, and of the 
sale of parcels of loose diamonds on several sub- 
sequent occasions ; witnesses would prove the 
lady's signature to the negotiation in an assumed 
name, that the cheques were presented at the 
bank, and that the notes received in exchange 
for them were tendered at the Army and Navy 
Stores and elsewhere in j^^^yi^^nt for the 
wedding clothes and furniture purchased by 
the defendant. 

Edith heard all this in the midst of a death- 
like stillness ; she was afraid to draw a breath 
lest she should lose a word ; she was straining 
forward with all-absorbing interest to catch with 



TREMLETT v. STANHOPE 129 

greater distinctness the terrible words as they 
dropped from the lips of the learned counsel. 

When the voice had stopped, she had a 
bewildered sense that everybody was looking 
at her with dreadful suspicion and abhorrence. 
The sea of faces massed up between floor and 
gallery were no longer indifferent ; they were 
all looking at her with accusing eyes ; they had 
condemned her already. Then, and not till 
then, she wavered as she stood ; the ground 
beneath seemed to rise up to meet her, and the 
ceiling of the court came down ; and all the 
faces piled up from floor to roof were swimming 
before her, like faces in a moving glass. 

She would have fallen where she stood, sway- 
ing to and fro in the dock, if someone had not 
put out a hand to save her. The touch of the 
supporting arm seemed to revive her, and she 
steadied herself by the bench ; but she did not 
look round. 

One by one the witnesses for the prosecution 
came forward and proved all, and more than all, 

VOL. II. 23 



130 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

that they were requh^ed to prove. Their testi- 
mony was overwhelming. All the detached bits 
of evidence fitted in and made a complete whole. 
There could not have been a clearer case. 

Everything that the counsel had stated was 
proved to be circumstantially true. The 
defence, when its turn came, would not have a 
leg to stand upon. Even Edith's own witnesses 
were called to give evidence against her. Her 
trustee, Mr. Tulkington, was called to prove her 
visit to him at an early hour on the morning of 
September 23, and to state the object and 
result of her visit to him. She had applied for 
an advance of money, and the advance had been 
refused. Beyond the payment of her usual 
quarterly pittance she had not received any 
money from the trust-moneys he held for her 
benefit. He was not in a position, from the 
terms of the trust, to make her an advance 
under any circumstances. 

At this part of the evidence Edith again 
showed signs of faintness ; for a moment she 



TREMLETT v. STANHOPE 131 

swayed backwards and forwards in the dock, 
and the judge desired that a chair might be 
brought for her. She did not accept the offer 
of a chair, though she had stood there for 
hours ; for her husband's hand was supporting 
her. He had shpped it into hers when the 
evidence began to tell against her ; and he 
kept it in his all through the rest of the day. 

She had not the courage to meet the tender 
trust in his eyes, but she clung to his hand as 
a drowning man clings to a straw. 

Dora sat in the well of the court during" 
all the dreadful damning evidence, as witness 
after witness stood up, strengthening the 
chain that was drawing round the pale criminal 
in the dock link by link : for such marks of 
unhesitating devotion and chivalrous fidelity she 
would have been well content to change places 
with her. 



CHAPTER XXII. 



ON BAIL. 



The dreadful day was over. It had been 
lived through. Edith had lived through it 
once ; she would live througfh it ao^ain and 
again, every day of her life. Every single 
event of the day, every word the witnesses had 
uttered, had been burnt into her mind. She 
could recall them each and all with terrible 
distinctness. 

To the surprise of everybody, Edith had 
again been released on bail. The counsel for 
the prosecution had been instructed not to 
oppose the application. He had shrugged his 
shoulders, but he had no alternative but to 



ON BAIL 133 

submit to the dictation of the plaintiff in the 
case, who was present at the table beside him. 

Edith's counsel had asked for a remand, in 
order that they might procure the attendance 
of certain witnesses who would throw a different 
light on the case. The counsel for the defence, 
in view of the overwhelming evidence brought 
forward by the prosecution, had serious 
thoughts at one time of throwing up his brief. 
He had not been fairly dealt with. Certain 
facts had been suppressed. His client had 
certainly not come into court with clean hands. 
He had no idea what line of defence would be 
set up. Under these circumstances he was 
justified in asking for a remand. 

The case was remanded for a fortnight. 
Edith went back in a cab with her husband. 
He led her out of the dock, supporting her as 
she stumbled blindly through the dimly-lighted 
passages to the side-door of the court, where a 
cab was awaiting her. 

She did not speak to him once all the 



134 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

way ; she only lay back in the cab with her 
white, set face outlined against the dark 
cushions ; and when he spoke to her she 
moaned. It would be kinder, he saw, to let her 
alone ; the only thing that he could do to 
comfort her was to assure her of his love — his 
undaunted love, his unwavering confidence. 

He could only enfold her with his sheltering 
arm, and pillow her tired head on his breast. 
His brain was in a whirl ; he did not know 
what to think ; but his heart never swerved for 
one moment from its loyalty. 

When the cab stop23ed at the door of the 
lodgings they had taken in London — they had 
not taken the flat, after all — Edith went 
straight up to her room. 

The woman of the house had not lighted the 
fire in her bedroom ; perhaps she had not 
thought she would come back. She went up 
alone — she would not let him come with her — • 
and she flung herself on the bed, and buried 
her face in the pillow. 



ON BAIL 135 

He came up presently with some wine, and 
pressed it to her white lips. It brought the 
colour back into them, and a flush crept up into 
her pale cheeks, and her dark eyes seemed to 
grow darker and brighter. 

' You heard what they said, Derek V she 
said in a whisper. 

He bowed his head; he could not answer her. 

'It is all true/ she said desperately, in a 
voice that thrilled him with its anguish and 
hopelessness. 

•' True V he said stupidly. 

He could not say another word ; there was a 
lump in his throat that was choking him. He 
put his arm round her involuntarily — he didn't 
know that he had done it — and drew her to his 
side. 

Edith shrank from his protecting arm, and 
put him away with her trembling hands. 

' Wait,' she said hoarsely — ' wait. You do 
not understand. It is all true. I have deceived 
you. I have lied to you and to the rest. I am 



136 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

a lying, shameful creature ; I am not worthy 
to be your wife !' 

Still he tried to put his arm around her. 
He was so slow-witted that he did not take in 
the meaning: of her words. 

' No, no, no !' she said with a shiver, ' never 
again ; I am not fit to be your wife. God help 
me ! It was for your sake I lied, Derek. I 
was mad. I thought only of my love for you ; 
I did not think that it was wrong. I would 
not have brought shame upon you for the 
world, and to shield you I lied. Oh, God ! how 
1 have lied 1' 

Her agony was dreadful to see. She shrank 
from his arms upon the floor, and buried her 
face in her hands. 

Derek stooped over her with words of en- 
dearment, and would have picked her up, but 
she shivered at his touch. 

' I am not fit to be your wife,' she moaned in 
the fierce abandonment of her despair. * I am 
a liar ; I have woven such a network of lies 



ON BAIL 137 

about my feet that I hardly know when I am 
speaking truth ; and they say that I am a thief T 

What could he say to her to soothe her ? 

He could only assure her of his love. It 
did not affect him that all the world thought 
her guilty, that by her own confession she was 
unworthy. 

He bent over her with his arms outstretched, 
his forgiving voice pleading in her ears — a 
man with a true, tender heart sorely tried ; but 
she thrust him away from her ; she could not 
bear to hear his voice ; the pity in his eyes 
hurt her more than reproaches. A gulf seemed 
to be widening between them, and she would 
not take the kindly, forgiving hand that was 
stretched out to her across it. 

There was nothing to be done but to leave 
her there till she came to herself He put a 
pillow beneath her head, and folded some warm 
wraps around her, and gave her some bromide 
that happened to be at hand, and turned the 
lamp down low. 



138 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

She was asleep, or seemed to be sleeping, 
when Derek came up half an hour later ; the 
draught seemed to have taken effect, or she 
was worn out with exhaustion. He stole out 
of the room, closing the door softly after him. 
It was necessary that he should see the lawyer 
that he had employed for Edith's defence that 
night ; he could not rest until he had seen 
him. He gave the woman of the house strict 
charge of his wife while he was away, and set 
out on his hopeless errand. 

Edith heard the street-door close upon him, 
and his footsteps echoing on the stones of the 
square. There was a reproach in every foot- 
fall. She listened till his sad, accusing foot- 
steps died away in the distance. 

Was it^ possible that he could still love 
her? 

In her bewildered, agonized state she could 
not understand her husband's love being un- 
changed, his acceptance of the pain as part of 
his love. His forbearance and patience and 



ON BAIL 139 

forgiveness added a keener sense of her un- 
worthiness. 

She did not think, as she lay there in her 
stupor, of herself; she thought only of her 
husband, and the shame that she had brought 
upon him. ' Oh ! why had they condemned 
him to this prolonged misery and suspense T 
she asked herself helplessly. ' Why had they 
deferred the hearing of the case, and spun out 
the thread of agony and shame V 

She had no defence to make, she told her- 
self a hundred times. All that had been said 
was true. Her lame little defence would only 
provoke scorn and mockery. 

It would have been better to have accepted 
her fate, to have received her sentence. The 
work of expiation would then have already 
begun. In anticipation she was looking 
eagerly forward to it ; it would be a balm to 
her lacerated conscience to work out day by 
day, in suffering and sorroAv, the expiation 
of her fault, if by any means she might by 



140 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

painful steps attain hereafter to pardon and 
peace. 

* I am not fit to stay with him !' she moaned, 
in the abandonment of her despair. ' I am not 
fit to sit by his fireside, to touch his hand 1 
Oh, if I could go away — if I could hide myself 
until the trial !' 

The thought took such possession of her that 
she could no longer lie there. She rose up from 
the ground, and with nervous, unsteady hands 
began to make some hasty preparation for a 
journey. She bathed her tear-stained face, 
and put back her dishevelled hair, and put on 
her wraps. She did not at all know where she 
was going. 

A burning desire to go away possessed her 
— to hide herself and her shame ; to creep 
away into a corner and die. The old animal 
craving was strong upon her — the unreasoning 
instinct to creep away somewhere and hide her 
wounds from curious eyes ; a craving as old as 
the world, handed down from Eve herself. 



ON BAIL 141 

' He could not wish me to stay — after — after 
what has happened,' she murmured as she went 
down the stairs. 

The hall was empty, and a light was burn- 
ing. She opened the street-door and closed it 
behind her noiselessly, and sped through the 
deserted Square with swift, stealthy footsteps. 
A soft rain was falling, and the rain-drops 
plashed upon her face, and the wet wind met 
her in a great gust as she turned the corner of 
the Square. 

When Captain Stanhope came back half an 
hour later, he found the door of her room open, 
and his wife gone. The woman of the house, 
who had been downstairs eating her supper, 
had heard nothing. She had fancied once that 
she had heard the front-door close, but, on going 
upstairs, had found all quiet, and returned to 
her supper. 

There was a letter for Derek on his wife's 
dressing-table — a blurred, blotted letter, ex- 
plaining the reason of her flight. 



142 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

'I could not live,' she said, 'arxd meet the 
pity in your eyes. It is better I should go 
away and suffer alone. If I live till this 
dreadful fortnight is over, I will not fail to 
come back in time.' 

This was all — no intimation of where she had 
gone. She had disappeared into the blackness of 
the w^inter night, and had left no trace behind. 

Edith had not gone very far. She had gone 
back to St. Oswald's. She had no other home 
to go to, and her wandering feet had naturally 
led her there. 

It was midnight when she reached Gotham, 
and the house was shut up. The iron gates 
were closed, and the fly had to wait a long 
time outside till someone could be aroused to 
come out and open them. There was not 
one light in all the closed windows of the 
shut -up house. 

' Can she be dead ?' she asked herself, as she 
looked up at the darkened windows, while the 
cab waited at the gate. 



ON BAIL 143 

It was like a picture of her future — the gloom 
and darkness and silence of that shut-up house. 
She would have to live her life alone, as her aunt 
had lived out her bitter, lonely, desolate life. 

It was darkness within the house as well as 
without. When Edith stood cold and trembling 
in the hall, and the front-door had shut behind 
her, the darkness of the tomb seemed to be 
closing around her. 

* Is my aunt still alive V she asked fearfully. 

' She is not expected to live through the 
night,' the woman said. ' She has not known 
anyone for days.' 

Edith crept softly up the wide staircase, and 
past the door of the silent room where the old 
woman lay dying. 

' You would like to go in to her, ma'am V 
the woman said, pausing at the door. 

' No, no ; I wiU not go in,' Edith said hastily. 
* I should only disturb her. If she is still living 
I will see her in the morning.' 

She shrank away from the closed door. She 



144 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

had gone through so much to-day ; she had no 
power to go through any more. Mind and 
body were worn out. She could not feel any 
more, she told herself, as she laid her head on 
the pillow. Nothing that could happen to her 
now would affect her. She was conscious only, 
as she lay there, of a desire to change places 
with the worn-out old body and the flickering 
wick of life that was slowly dying out in the 
room at the end of the passage. The old 
woman was going to her rest — to her account, 
doubtless ; but to her rest — whilst Edith had 
still her life to live. 

Utterly wearied out, Edith fell asleep with 
the trouble and gloom closing round her. 

When she awoke the next morning, Pen- 
fold was standing by her bedside. It was not 
quite light, a chill December dawn, and the 
woman was urging her to rise quickly. 

'If you come now, Miss Edith, you will see 
the last of her. She was sensible a moment 
ago, and she was asking for you.' 



ON BAIL 145 

Edith drew some wraps around her and 
followed Penfold to the end of the passage. 
There was a feeble light burning in her aunt's 
room, and the curtains of the bed were drawn 
back to give her air. 

The poor worn-out old woman was propped up 
with pillows, but her head had fallen forward 
on her chest, and her eyes were closed ; she did 
not see Edith standing there. The shadows 
were stealing over her gray face. 

' Dear aunt,' Edith said, taking the damp 
fingers that lay on the coverlet in hers — ' dear 
aunt, I am here — Edith : you were asking for 
me.' 

The old woman heard her voice, but she did 
not open her eyes ; it was another Edith who 
was present to her. 

She was muttering to herself in a low voice, 
and Edith stooped over her to catch the words 
she was repeating ; she had been repeating 
them, the woman said, all through the night. 
They were indistinct and ran into one another, 

VOL. II. - 24 



146 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

but Edith, leaning over her, with her ear to her 
poor lips, thought she caught the words : ' A 
— life — long — feud — a — life — long — feud ;' and 
then a pause, and again, in a tone of entreaty : 
* Edith, forgive — forgive !' 

' The feud, whatever it was, is healed at 
last, dear,' she said, pressing the poor clammy 
hand she held in hers, ' and Edith forgives you. 
Edith's child forgives you in Edith's name. 
We have all need of forgiveness, God knows. 
The least we can do is to forgive one 
another.' 

■ Her tears were falling on the hand she held 
in hers, and she dropped down on her kn^es 
beside the bed and repeated in her broken 
voice the most healing and uniting of all 
prayers, * Forgive us our trespasses ' 

Even while she was speaking, the fingers of 
the hand she held closed round hers with a 
gentle pressure and then relaxed. When 
Edith looked up, the two old servants were 
stooping over the pillow, busied in some noise- 



ON BAIL 147 

less way, and Penfold led her weeping from 
the room. 

The shock of her aunt's death, following so 
soon upon the trying ordeal she had just gone 
through, stunned her; her despair of yesterday 
seemed like an old tune come suddenly to an 
end, broken off in the middle. 

When she got back to her room, past all 
those unshuttered windows, through which the 
new day was looking in at her, she could re- 
member nothing but the scene she had just 
left. 

She could but dimly recall the events of the 
past day ; she could only think of the white 
figure stretched cold and motionless upon the 
great state bed. 



CHAPTER XXIII. 

' MY HUSBAND !' 

Dora and her mother went back to Nunwell 
the day after the trial. There was nothing to 
keep them in London. Dora's tender con- 
science was pricking her for deserting her 
husband. If he were sick, her place was by his 
side. She would have gone over to Fryston the 
following morning had not something happened. 
There had been a scare at Fryston only the 
day before. An improvement had taken place 
in Captain Tremlett's condition lately, and the 
watchers had relaxed their vigilance. The im- 
provement had been so great that an attendant 
no longer slept in his room. 



'MY HUSBAND!' 149 

He was not an easy patient to have to do 
with. In his intervals of sanity he disputed 
the right to have watchers about him, and ta 
have any restraint put upon his movements. 
He had been perfectly sane for some days past, 
and had returned to his former occupations. 
He was having the rooms fitted up for the 
reception of his wife. The boudoir that Dora 
was to occupy was his especial care. The 
beautiful old china that had been sent from 
Castle Hill was displayed here on dainty 
Sheraton tables and cabinets, and pictures by 
Greuze and Lancret hung upon the walls. 
There was nothing wanting to make the room 
complete — nothing but the presence of the 
mistress for whom it was prepared. 

He would sit for hours in the day in his 
wife's boudoir, waiting for her to return, and 
he would allow no intruders across the sacred 
threshold. 

He was sitting here one day as usual — 
the men who should have been lookino^ after 



ISO THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

him were elsewhere : they discreetly kept out 
of sight when their presence was not required 
— when an alarm was raised. When the 
keepers reached the apartment, their charge 
was no longer there. The room was empty — 
quite empty. He had thrown every article of 
furniture and china out of the windows, and 
was pursuing one of the gardeners who had 
raised the alarm through the grounds with a 
naked cavalry sword. 

After this episode it was not considered 
advisable for Dora to join her husband at 
Fryston. Old trusted servants were sent from 
Castle Hill to look after him, and qualified 
attendants were in the house. Dora could 
have done him no good if she had been there, 
and her presence would only have excited him. 
Sir Bourchier wrote a very kind and con- 
siderate letter to his daughter-in-law, but he 
did not advise her to return to her husband. 
He begged her to make Castle Hill her home 
until the delusion had passed away. It would 



'MY HUSBAND!' 151 

pass, the doctors agreed, by-and-by — they did 
not say it very hopefully — but it might return 
at any time. The outlook was not a bright 
one. 

Dora did not accept his offer. She remained 
at Nunwell with her mother. 

Something happened on the occasion of 
their hurried return to town that they might be 
present when Edith's trial was resumed. Dora 
had waited anxiously — during the time for 
which the case was remanded — for a sane 
interval, in the hope that her husband might 
be induced to sign instructions to his counsel 
to withdraw the charge ; but she had waited 
in vain. Until the last day — the day before 
the trial — the doctors had led her to hope 
that a change might take place in his condi- 
tion. It had seemed hopeful in the early part 
of the day that Dora had fixed for her return 
to town, and she put off her journey until a late 
train. She put it off so late that she had to 
travel by the night-mail, which left Hereford 



152 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

after midnight, and she did not get her 
husband's signature after all. 

There was no alternative but to travel all 
night, if she wished to be in town in time for 
Edith's trial the following day. 

It was too late to send a telegram to the 
servants in Lowndes Square. There were 
only two servants left there, as the house was 
shut up. One of the servants left was Mrs. 
Bellew's new maid. With her old faithful 
servant, Parker, about her, she did not want 
the services of the new maid ; it was more as a 
pretext for getting her out of the way that she 
left her behind as housekeeper in charge of the 
premises in Lowndes Square. 

The nisfht- train from Hereford did not reach 
Paddington until five o'clock the next morning, 
and then there was a long cold ride through 
London. It was still dark when the cab drew 
up at Lowndes Square, and the coachman had 
to ring the bell two or three times before he 
could make anybody hear. 



'MY HUSBAND!' 153 

He made someone hear at last. Mrs. 
Bellew heard voices inside, unfamiliar voices, 
and when Patience opened the door, a man 
was holding a candle at the top of the 
kitchen stairs. He put down the candlestick 
and beat a hasty retreat when he saw the 
ladies standing in the hall, and Mrs. Bellew 
heard his slipperless feet pattering down the 
stairs. 

' Who is that man V she asked in a terrible 
voice, ' and what business has he here V 

Patience didn't faint this time, but she burst 
into tears. 

' It's my husband, ma'am !' she sobbed. 

' Your husband ! How long have you been 
married V 

' I have been married three years, an' I've 
left him a dozen times. He always comes after 
me when I'm in a good place and gets me out of 
it. Oh, I wish I had never been born I I wish 
I had never seen him !' 

It was the old story. There was not a single 



154 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

detail missing. The foolish girl, following the 
example of her betters, had married a man she 
knew nothing about, and she had reaped the 
reward of her misplaced confidence. After 
putting up with his ill-usage and drunkemiess 
as long as she was able, and parting with her 
clothes and the little money she had saved, she 
had run away from him. She had not been 
able to run very far ; he had always found her 
out. He had found her out at Nunwell the 
day she broke the old Worcester bowl. 

He had followed her up to town, and the 
housemaid having gone off to some festivity, he 
had stayed the night. She had not been able 
to get rid of him. 

' He is my husband,' she said, weeping ; 
' wherever I am, he has a right to come.' 

He did not retain the right to come to Lowndes 
Square very long. Mrs. Bellew packed Patience 
off at once, with a month's wages in her 
pocket. The cab that had brought her from 
the station took Mr. Yenner and his wife 



'MY HUSBAND!' 155 

away. He was a shabby, dissipated-looking 
fellow, with a hang-dog air. He did not look 
at all like the possessor of a diamond necklace, 
as he struggled up the area steps with his wife's 
box in his arms. 



CHAPTER XXIV. 

' MY grandfather's MINIATURE.' 

A SAD week of darkened windows, of hushed 
footsteps treading softly outside a closed door, 
of men coming and going on dismal errands ; 
a week of silence and rest and forgetfulness ; 
a week to weiofh the small trials of this life 
against the reward of all sacrifice and sorrow 
in the life to come. 

Edith was left pretty much to herself during 
the week that followed her aunt's death. The 
trustees under Miss Gunning's will came down 
the next day, and put their seals upon every- 
thing, but they did not interfere with Edith. 

Her uncle, Eichard Darcy, came down with 



'MY GRANDFATHER'S MINIATURE' 157 

his wife a few days before the funeraL Edith 
was too ill to see them. She was shut up in a 
darkened room, with the doctor who had been 
in attendance on her aunt coming to visit her 
twice a day. He had ordered rest, perfect rest, 
and Penfold was charged to carry out his 
instructions. 

If Penfold had not been on the watch, Mrs. 
Richard Darcy would have broken in upon her. 
She would not believe that Edith was really 
ill ; she did not hesitate to say that it was only 
a pretext for hiding away until her trial ; and 
she expressed herself in no measured terms on 
Edith's having dared to return to Gotham 
with this dark shadow of guilt hanging over 
her. 

If the trustees had listened to her, Edith 
would have been turned out at once; she 
would not have been allowed to wait until the 
funeral. 

Mrs. Richard went over the house with her 
husband from ceUar to roof. There was not a 



158 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

room in the house that was sacred to her, not 
even the chamber where poor Miss Gunning lay 
in her coffin. She went through all the rooms 
and appraised the furniture, and settled in her 
mind what changes she would make when the 
house was hers. She was in such a hurry to 
begin that she could hardly wait for the 
funeral, and for the will to be read, and the 
necessary formalities to be gone through. She 
wanted to begin at once. 

The place really wanted turning out from 
top to bottom. It was in a dreadful state of 
repair ; the floors were full of dry rot, and the 
walls were damp with mildew, and the furni- 
ture was old-fashioned and shabby. There was 
a great deal to be done. The first, the very 
first, thing that Richard Darcy's wife decided 
to do was to turn out all those ridiculous glass 
cases of cats in the room that Miss Gunning 
usually occupied ; the cats, live and dead, were 
to be got rid of at once. 

Before she went away she excited Penfold's 



MY GRANDFATHER'S MINIATURE' 159 

indignation by proposing that Blue- Eye's aunt 
should be poisoned forthwith. 

Penfold took the white, complaining morsel 
in her arms and carried her to Edith, for fear 
the woman should carry out her wish. The 
frightened, neglected little creature would not 
leave Miss Gunning's closed door all through 
that sad week, and once, when the door had 
been opened, the poor cat had crept in, and was 
found on the day of the funeral by the men who 
had come to bear her mistress away, keeping 
watch at the foot of the coffin. 

She did not need any poisoning ; she died 
the next day. Penfold declared she had died 
of a broken heart. If the lonely old woman 
had no one to miss her when she was trone, she 
had certainly been missed by a white cat with a 
ridiculous name. 

Edith's husband came down to St. Oswald's 
two days after her flight from town. After a 
fruitless search for twenty-four hours, he had 
lighted upon the right track. He had not 



i6o THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

lighted upon it by himself. He had been put 
upon the track by a detective, who had called 
upon him and offered his assistance. It was 
the detective Finch, whom Sir Bourchier had 
employed. 

He had disappointed his patron's expecta- 
tions ; he had not succeeded in discovering the 
missing necklace. He had gone off on a differ- 
ent scent to the detectives at Scotland Yard; he 
had pursued his inquiries, as has been told, in 
an opposite quarter, but without results. He 
was as far as ever from finding the necklace. 
He came to Captain Stanhope two days after 
his wife's disappearance, and counselled him to 
fetch her back to town without delay. The 
worst thing that could happen to her would be 
for it to be known that she had run away. It 
would be equivalent to an admission of guilt. 
He had discovered Edith's whereabouts, if he 
hadn't discovered the necklace ; he was sharp 
enough in some things. 

Edith would not see her husband when he 



* MY GRANDFATHER^S MINIATURE' i6r 

came to Gotham. She sent a humble little 
message by Penfold : she was ill in bed ; the 
events of the last few days had shaken her, 
but she would come up in time for the trial ; 
whatever happened, she would not fail to 
come up for the trial. 

' I think you should see him,' Penfold said, 
when she came back after delivering Edith's 
message. ' I never saw a gentleman take on 
so when he heard you were ill, and that 
you wouldn't let him come up to see you. 
It isn't the trial he's thinking of — it's 
you.' 

But Edith would not be persuaded. 

' I must wait till after the funeral,' she said. 
' I could not go away and leave her ; she will 
not be here long. This is my place until — until 
she is carried away.' 

Derek Stanhope had to be satisfied with this 
assurance. He did not leave St. Oswald's ; he 
put up at the Lion Hotel, which was not a 
hundred yards from the gates of Gotham 

VOL. II. 25 



i62 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

House, to be near his wife, and waited for the 
funeral. 

Two days after, Miss Gunning was carried 
through the iron gates, followed by her nephew, 
E/ichard Darcy, and her trustees, and a few old 
tradespeople of St. Oswald's who had known 
her in the old days. 

Edith's husband joined the procession at the 
gates ; but he left it at the churchyard, after 
the funeral was over. He did not come back to 
the house. 

He ought to have come back ; there was no 
one so interested in the function that took 
place in that dark, gloomy dining-room after 
the funeral was over as he was. 

Mr. Richard Darcy and the lawyers and 
trustees came back, and Mrs. Richard, who had 
come down from London in the deepest crape 
mourning, was waiting to receive them. 

There was no one else to do the honours of 
the house. Poor Edith was in her room, crying 
herself blind over the Burial Service, which she 



*MY GRANDFATHER'S MINIATURE' 163 

had been reading while they were away. She 
was in no mood to go among strangers. 

The bhnds were drawn up in the darkened 
rooms, and the wheels of life had begun to 
move once more. The will, which the lawyers 
came back to read, was dated some years ago, 
when Edith Darcy had been left an orphan on 
the old woman's hands. There were some 
legacies left to the children of her nephew, 
Richard Darcy ; but the old house and its 
contents, and the bulk of her property, were 
left to her grandniece, Edith Darcy. 

The unexpected always happens. Nothing 
could have been more unexpected than Edith's 
sudden accession to fortune. It did not move 
her as it would have done if it had come at 
another time ; it had come too late. She 
seemed to be frozen by the events that had 
happened to her — to be indifferent to all that 
might happen to her now. She was an heiress 
with a banker's account ; the old house, which 
had been her ancestors' before her, was hers. 



i64 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

If it had all happened before, it would have 
been so different ; but now 

On the day of the funeral, after all the com- 
pany had gone away — Mr. Richard Darcy and 
his wife in a great rage, and the lawyers and 
the trustees with their black bags and their 
papers — Edith had a visitor who desired to 
see her on important business. 

It was the detective Finch, whom Sir 
Bourchier had employed to trace the dia- 
monds. 

The dull December day was closing in 
when Edith went down the stairs to see the 
man who had called at such an unfitting 
moment. 

The lamp that usually burnt in the hall had 
not been lighted, and the staircase was full of 
gloom. She remembered the burden that had 
so lately been carried down it. She seemed to 
see the sad procession going on before her, as 
she came slowly down the stairs in the growing- 
dusk, and to hear the halting footsteps of the 



'MY GRANDFATHER'S MINIATURE' 165 

men ; and a rustle stole behind her all the way. 
It was only her heavy skirts trailing on the 
stairs, but the rustle stole behind her like a 
whisper. 

The detective had been shown into the 
dining-room, where the lawyers had met after 
the funeral. The chairs were still in the places 
round the table where they but lately had risen 
from them. It did not seem to Edith, in the 
exaltation of the moment, that they had really 
gone away. Their bodily presence was no 
longer here, but they did not seem quite gone 
in spirit. Edith fancied they were still there, 
sitting round the board, listening while the 
man unfolded his unwelcome business. She 
had seen the man before, and she knew what 
he had come about ; it was not the first inter- 
view that he had had with her. 

' I think you should lose no time in going 
back to town to prepare your defence,' he said, 
when she came into the room. ' I have called 
to ofPer you any help I can give you.' 



i66 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

^ I have no defence to make,' Edith said 
sadly ; ' all that they have said is true.' 

' Exactly ; but that does not prevent your 
getting up a case. The necklet has not been 
traced to your possession ; it has not yet been 
shown that it ever v^as in your possession. The 
sale of a few loose stones does not prove the 
possession of the necklet. If you will tell me 
where the stones came from that you offered 
for sale, I will not trouble you any further. 
Forgive me saying it, but, if I am to be of any 
use to you, you must be quite candid with me ; 
you must keep nothing back.' 

Edith bowed her head ; she had deserved 
this, and more. She had deserved that even 
such a common man as this should not take 
her word. 

* The diamonds that I sold had nothing to do 
with Mrs. Tremlett's necklace/ she said, with 
some dignity. ' They belonged to a miniature 
I have — the miniature of my grandfather ; it 
had a setting of diamonds.' 



*MY GRANDFATHER'S MINIATURE' 167 

' If they were your own diamonds, why did 
you sell them under an assumed name V he 
asked. 

* Why ? There were reasons why I did not 
wish my name to appear. It was not quite an 
assumed name. I had some right to it : it was 
my mother s name.' 

' If I am to be of any use to you, you must 
tell me your real reason for concealing your 
name.' 

She had no alternative but to tell him the 
truth. 

' The miniature did not belong to me then ; 
it belongs to me now — my aunt has left me 
everything ; and — and I stole it from her.' 

The man ought to have been shocked, but 
he did not seem at all disturbed by Edith's 
confession. 

' That is very good evidence,' he said with a 
smile. ' You wanted the money ; you had no 
other means of raising it ; you were in a 
desperate strait for money, and, anticipat- 



i68 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

ing your ownership, you disj)Osed of the 
diamonds before they came legally into your 
possession V 

Edith bowed her head. 

' I took the miniature, knowing I had no 
right to it — that probably I should never have 
a right to it. I was desperate, as you say ; I 
did not know what I did.' 

* And, to hide your guilt, you sold the stones 
under an assumed name V 

' I sold them under my mother's name. If I 
had sold them under my own name, and it had 
come to the knowledge of any members of my 
uncle's family, they would have prosecuted me 
as a common thief 

' You were not on good terms with your 
uncle's family ?' 

' I was at variance with his wife. She did 
not like my living here with my aunt. They 
were all jealous of me.' 

' Was your uncle aware of the existence of 
the diamonds vou sold V 



'MY GRANDFATHER^S MINIATURE' 169 

* No one was aware of their existence. The 
trustees had taken away everything of value 
out of the house, and sent it to the bank for 
safety, years ago, when my aunt first went out 
of her mind. There was nothing left that they 
knew of for her to make away with. I dis- 
covered the existence of the diamonds by 
accident. They had been locked away for 
sixty years ; they were of no use to anybody, 
and — and I wanted the money ' 

This was Edith's only plea. They were of no 
use to anybody, and she wanted the money. 

' But surely there was some record of them ; 
someone must have known of them. Even had 
they been locked up so long as you say, there 
must have been some record of them. Are 
they mentioned in your aunt's will ?' 

' No details are mentioned in the will. I am 
left residuary legatee, after the legacies are 
paid ; there is nothing said about the dia- 
monds.' 

The detective looked blank. It would be 



I/O THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

hard to prove the sale of diamonds that were 
never known to exist. 

' I should like to see the miniature,' he said 
presently — ' the miniature of your grandfather, 
from which the stones were taken.' 

Edith left the room, and returned presently 
with the gold locket in her hand. 

' But this frame is perfect in itself,' he said, 
examining it closely ; * it has never had any 
other setting.' 

Then Edith had to explain how it had been 
fixed into an outer frame of diamonds, a frame 
that had not originally belonged to it, and how- 
it had slipped out of the frame in her hands, 
and some of the stones had fallen out. 

' There is no mark of any outer frame,' he 
said, holding it under the light ; ' it will be diffi- 
cult to persuade the jury that it has ever had 
any other setting. The frame itself, from which 
the stones were taken, will be the only proof 
that we can offer. You have kept the frame ?' 

Edith shook her head and blushed. 



'MY GRANDFATHER'S MINIATURE' 171 

' It was so broken,' she said, ' it was no use ; 
I had to break it to get the stones out, and I 
sold it — I exchanged it, rather — for some silver 
boxes for my dressing-case. I had some 
bangles I did not want, and I sold them with 
it. The man allowed me the value of old 
silver for melting down, and I paid the differ- 
ence.' 

* How long ago did you get rid of it T he 
asked eagerly. ' There might be some chance 
still of reclaiming it.' 

' I got rid of it directly after I sold the 
stones,' Edith said, hanging her head, with her 
cheeks dyed crimson. 

She was more ashamed of selling that 
trumpery frame than of disposing of the dia- 
monds. 

' You were afraid of being found out V he 
said with dreadful candour. ' You got rid of it 
to prevent detection if the diamond setting was 
missed V 

Edith could only bow her head in silence. 



172 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

' You have done what most people would 
have done. You have been too clever. You 
have cut away the ground from beneath your 
own feet. If we can get the jury to believe 
you innocent, it will only be by proving your 
guilt. You must be prepared to make a full 
confession of having stolen the diamonds from 
Miss Gunning.' 

He went away, and left her overwhelmed 
with shame. She was a thief, after all. 
Though the diamonds were now hers, she 
had stolen them. The tissue of falsehoods 
which had been proved against her had been 
told to conceal the theft, and she would 
have to acknowledge them in open court. 
Was anything wanting to complete her humi- 
liation ? 

When the detective had gone, Edith sat 
stupidly gazing into the fire, and wondering 
what more was awaiting her, what there re- 
mained for her to go through. So much had 
been crowded into the events of these few days, 



*MY GRANDFATHER'S MINIATURE' 173 

that it did not seem she could go through any 
more alone. 

She was wonderincr whether her husband 
would come ; he had a ricrht to come here now 
— it was her own house. She could bear what- 
ever might fall to her to bear, she told herself, 
as she sat there before the dying embers in the 
grate, if he were beside her to share it with her ; 
but she could not go through anything more 
alone. Oh, if he would only come ! 

Captain Stanhope had heard of his wife's 
unexpected accession to fortune within an hour 
after the will was read. Everybody in St. 
Oswald's had heard of it. Perhaps the fortune 
stood in his way. He never could understand 
why he had not gone over to her at once — he 
was not a hundred yards off — and taken her 
away. If it had not been for the fortune that 
had so suddenly fallen to her, he would cer- 
tainly have gone to her after the funeral and 
taken her away from that gloomy house. 



CHAPTEH XXV. 

FREE ! 

Edith went up to town the next day. She 
went up with her husband ; but she did not 
return to the rooms he had -taken for her — the 
rooms where she had left all her things. She 
drove straight to a hotel. The trial would 
come on the next day, and she might not 
require its shelter another night. She did not 
look forward at all hopefully to the result of 
the trial. 

Before she could be seen in town, she had 
to do some shopping — she had to get some 
mourning for her aunt. Among all the beauti- 
ful things she had selected with so much care 



FREE! 175 

for her trousseau — the things that were left 
behind at the lodgings — there was not a single 
black gown. The hideous habiliments of 
mourning had not been included among her 
wedding clothes. She would have to wear 
mourning for her aunt a year, and by that 
time, if she ever wanted to put them on again, 
her dainty gowns would be all old-fashioned. 
The sacrifices she had made for them had been 
in vain. 

She was wearing these garments of woe the 
next day when she stood again at the bar of the 
Central Criminal Court to answer the charges 
against her. Perhaps it was the unrelieved 
blackness of her mourning, contrasting with 
the haggard whiteness of her face, that gave 
her a look of age and suffering. She looked 
years older than when she had stood there 
last, and the mental agony she had gone 
through had left its lines upon her altered 
face. Whatever her sin had been, she had 
already paid the penalty of it. 



176 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

The physical strain had told upon her 
strength ; she was so weak that she swayed 
as if she would have fallen as she took her 
place at the bar. If it had not been that her 
husband, who was allowed to stand near her, 
held her hand in his, as he had done at the 
opening of her trial, she could not have stood 
there at all. 

It was all over, she told herself, as she 
stood there before her accusers, with her eyes 
cast down, clinging to her husband's hand — it 
was all over ; they would not listen to her 
defence ; it would be vain to tell that idle 
story of the miniature and its frame of 
diamonds. She had not a tittle of evidence 
to support it. It was only adding shame to 
shame to repeat it. 

They kept her so long standing there trem- 
bling, with her head drooping on her breast, 
and an oppressive, overwhelming sense of a 
great gulf yawning at her feet ! 

She could not think why they were keeping 



FREE! 177 

her. If she had looked up, if the shame and 
agony that bowed her down had suffered her 
to look up, she would have seen that something 
had happened. The lawyers at the table were 
talking together with hushed voices and grave 
faces, and a whisper had gone round the court. 
Everybody was looking grave. The jury were 
leaning forward aud whispering to each other, 
and the judge, who had taken his seat, was 
disturbed. 

Edith saw nothino- of this ; she did not even 
heed the whisper that went round the court. 
She was only conscious of a dreadful agonizing 
suspense, and dumbly wondered why her 
sentence was delayed. 

The w^hispering suddenly ceased, and a 
death-like stillness prevailed. Everybody in 
the crowded court was straining forward to 
catch what was beincr said. One of the bar- 
risters at the table was speaking. He was 
not speaking very plainly ; he was strangely 
agitated. Edith could not think why he was 

VOL. II. 26 



178 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

so agitated, and why the people were hstening 
so eagerly. It could not be her sentence yet — 
or was the trial over ? Had it already taken 
place, she unconscious of it ? and was her 
sentence being pronounced ? 

Hush ! What was this that he was saying ? 

Why was his voice broken and faltering ? 

He had a duty to perform, he said — an 
unexpected duty ; an unforeseen event had 
happened. He was instructed by his client, 
whose name was coupled with that of her 
husband, Captain Lionel Tremlett, to withdraw 
the charge against the defendant. The charge 
would have been withdrawn in an earlier stage 
of the trial, if the plaintiff had succeeded in 
obtaining the consent of her husband to its 
withdrawal. That consent was no longer 
necessary ; there was now only one plaintiff in 
the case. Captain Tremlett had that morning 
committed suicide. 

Edith never knew what happened after. 
She had fallen forward on the dock, and had 



FREE! 179 

been carried out of the court senseless. When 
she came back to consciousness, she was in a 
room at the hotel, and her husband was bend- 
ing over her. She was still clinging to his 
hand as she had clung to it in the court. That 
clinging touch had drawn her back to the 
shores of life. 

'It is all over,' he murmured, bending over 
her, ' and you are free.' 
Free ! but at what cost I 

The unhappy man had escaped the vigilance 
of his keepers and had taken his own life. 
The precautions that had been taken had only 
been relaxed for a few seconds, and this had 
been the result. He died with no one about 
him but servants and keepers, and the dreadful 
creations of his diseased imao^ination. Dora 
and her mother were in town waitinof for 
Edith's trial when the awful news reached 
them. 

The poor little bride travelled back with her 
mother to Hereford later in the day. She 



i8o THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

travelled back in a compartment reserved for 
their sole use ; she shrank from meeting any- 
curious eyes, from being seen and pointed at 
as a widow who could not weep. She would 
have given anything to have wept like other 
women — to have felt sorry — but the tears and 
the sorrow would not come at her bidding. 

Perhaps it was the horror of it that stayed 
the channels of her tears, that had turned her 
into stone. But this was not the worst. She 
was afraid of herself, of her own feelings ; she 
was ashamed to meet her mother's eyes. Only 
Parker understood her. 

When they reached Nunwell, Sir Bourchier 
and his daughters were already at Fryston. 
Dora shrank from meeting her husband's rela- 
tives, and she could not bring herself to go 
beneath the roof where he was lying. When 
they asked her if she would like to look upon 
her husband's face in his coffin, she had to put 
a restraint upon herself to keep from laughing 
aloud. • 



FREE! i8i 



i T', 



I'm so afraid I'm glad, Parker,' she whispered 
to her faithful serving- woman. ' I would give 
anything to be sorry, to weep like other 
women !' 

' The tears will come by-and-by — come in 
plenty,' Parker said, to comfort her. ' You 
have not had time to forget. It isn't forgiving, 
it's forgetting, that's so hard.' 

Parker had not got to the root of the matter. 
It was not a question of forgiving or forgetting ; 
it had nothing to do with any sense of injury. 
There was no aching void to fill. Death had 
made no separation. Where there was no real 
union, there could be no separation, no sense of 
loss. It had been a manage a la mode; while 
her husband held her, he held her by force ; 
when he loosened his hold, she slipped out of 
it. She turned away from the remembrance of 
her married life with a shudder ; she hailed her 
liberty, bought at whatever cost, with a spasm 
of relief It had been a miserable mistake from 
fii^st to last. 



i82 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

They carried the wretched man to Castle 
Hill, and buried him in great state in the 
family mausoleum. Dora was too ill to attend 
her husband's funeral. She was shut up in a 
darkened room, with some kind of hysterical 
attack that culminated in a fever. The sense 
of her freedom had been more than she could 
bear. When her husband was being carried to 
his grave, she had broken down in wild hyste- 
rical tears and laughter. She had called her- 
self ' a hateful, hateful creature for being glad/ 
She had shocked everybody by her outspoken 
joy at her freedom. 

' It is too dreadful !' the weeping women 
cried, stopping their ears ; ' she cannot know 
what she is saying ; the strain has been too 
much for her.' 

Those who had witnessed that little scene on 
the occasion of her last visit to Castle Hill, 
when she fled screaming in the night through 
the darkened house, thought differently. 

Human nature will not always be kept down. 



FREE! 183 

They took her back to her mother's house as 
soon as she could be moved ; she would not go 
to the home her husband had prepared for her. 
She would not set foot in Fryston. 

' I should be always seeing him, mamma, if 
I went there,' she said, when her mother urged 
her, for form's sake, to go back for a time to 
the deserted house. ' I should hear his voice 
calling to me when anyone spoke ; I should 
hear his footsteps on the stairs whenever a 
board creaked ; I should never see a door open 
but I should expect to see his face. I can 
never, never go there. If you knew what I 
have suffered you would not ask me !' 

Her mother did not ask her after this ; she 
let her have her way. Her heart was sad 
enough, though it was at rest. It was a 
sadness, a pain, that lasted her all her life. 

Her mother took her away after a time ; 
there was no reason for keeping her there in 
the midst of sad memories. Whatever duty 
to her dead husband she had left undone must 



i84 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

remain undone for ever. She would not have 
brought him back if she could. It was not 
regret that filled her heart ; it was only- 
pain. 

Dora went abroad till the spring. She saw 
strange places and strange faces ; she tried her 
hardest to forget. Perhaps, if she had not 
tried so persistently, she would have forgotten 
more easily. It was the constant strain of trying 
not to remember, of shutting out the sights and 
sounds that, with weary iteration, presented 
themselves before her mind, that kept her from 
forgetting. She will forget by-and-by, when 
she has ceased to try not to remember — when 
other interests have come into her mind. There 
are so many interests in the world outside our 
personal sorrows and regrets. 

Several things happened while Dora was 
abroad. Old Sir Bourchier Tremlett died. He 
did not long survive his son ; the shock was 
too much for him. He never lifted his proud 
old head after the news reached him on that 



FREE! 185 

miserable morning. The wretched man had 
not only wasted his own life; he had brought 
his father's gray hairs with sorrow to the 
grave. 

There was no one of his own kith and kin 
to succeed Sir Bourchier ; the title and the 
estate went to a distant cousin. Ermyntrude 
Tremlett and her sister left Castle Hill after 
their father's death, and their place was filled 
by strangers. 

It is an ill wind that blows no one any good. 
The ill wind that wrought such desolation in 
the household at Castle Hill brought hope and 
fortune to a far-off kinsman, a poor briefless 
barrister burdened with an invalid wife and a 
dozen children. The good fortune had not 
come a moment too soon : it came soon enough 
to provide the boys with a University educa- 
tion, to give the girls a place in society, and to 
bring the faded roses back to the cheeks of the 
invalid mother. 

It was hard work for the new baronet to 



i86 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

keep up the state of the old house during that 
first year, until the rents came in. Fryston, 
which belonged to the estate, and which Dora 
refused to occupy, was advertised to let, and 
the contents — the beautiful new furniture that 
Captain Tremlett had bought for his wife — were 
to be sold by auction. 

There were two great posters hanging on the 
lodge gates, announcing the sale of the magnifi- 
cent furniture of the mansion, and the effects 
of the late owner, when Dora and her mother 
drove past a few days after her return to 
Nunwell. 

' I don't think you should have let his things 
be sold, Dora,' Mrs. Bellew said with a sigh, as 
she saw the posters of the sale on the gates. 
* It would have been better to have kept them, 
or given them away.' 

Dora shivered, and shrank back in her corner 
of the carriage. 

' I would not have kept them for the world, 
mamma ! Ah ! you don't know. It is better 



FREE! 187 

for everything to go into the hands of strangers. 
They can have no memories for them. I could 
not bear to have a sinoie thincr about me that 
reminded me — of — of ' 

Mrs. Bellew asked her no more. 

Everything belonging to the late owner of 
Fryston was to be sold with the furniture and 
horses and carriages. Whips, and guns, and 
fishing-tackle, and books — there were not many 
books — and a fine collection of sporting pictures, 
and all the odds and ends that men usually 
gather about them — nothing was to be kept 
back. People could not understand how the 
family could allow such things to be sold. It 
would have been so much better taste, under 
the circumstances, to have — well, to have 

Nobody could quite say what would have 
been the best thing to have done with them — 
under the circumstances. 



CHAPTER XXVI. 

' KNOCK IT DOWN I' 

Edith had gone back to her aunt's house after 
the trial. She had gone back alone. She was 
free to go where she would ; and she had chosen 
to go back there. She was free ; the charge 
against her had been withdrawn, but the dark 
cloud of suspicion still hung over her. It had 
never been raised for a moment ; it had only 
been put aside. The world still believed her 
guilty. She could never, never hold up her 
head again ; she could never take her place by 
her husband's side in society : she would only 
shame him. After all she had done, the 
miserable shifts she had resorted to for his 



'KNOCK IT DOWN!' 189 

sake — that he might be proud of her ; that he 
might never regret the choice he had made ; 
that his friends might never have cause to re- 
proach him — her presence would only shame him. 

' I have brought enough sorrow on you 
already, Derek,' she said, when she was able to 
say anything, after she was taken back to the 
hotel, and he urged her to go abroad with him 
for a time, till the affair of the trial had blown 
over. ' You must let me take my own way ; 
you must not ask me to come back to you 
until I can come without brinofinof shame and 
dishonour with me. When you can prove my 
innocence, before all the world, of the cruel 
charge that miserable man brought against me, 
then you may come and claim me.' 

She would not be moved from this deter- 
mination ; nothing that he could urge would 
move her. 

' Your own people still believe me guilty,' 
she said, sobbing on his breast ; though she 
desired to leave him, she still cluno^ to him. 



190 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

* They would never receive me with this dread- 
ful suspicion hanging over me. You must 
prove to them that I am innocent, Derek. 
You must fight my battle for me ; you know 
what a weak, wicked woman I have been ; you 
know what dreadful lies I have told, what a 
mean, despicable thing I have done ' 

' Hush ! we will never, never talk about it 
again,' he interrupted, folding her in his arms, 
and stopping her wild accusations with his 
trembling lips. ' My darling, you must forget 
all this ; it was for my sake. Shall I ever 
forget it was for my sake V 

He could not persuade her, though he 
assured her of his unalterable love, his forgive- 
ness and forgetfulness of all that was past. 
Her fault— if fault it were — was not only 
forgiven ; it had become the source of an un- 
hesitating confidence in the future which no 
subsequent events could ever mar. 

What other assurance of forgiveness and 
reconciliation could a woman desire ? 



'KNOCK IT DOWN!' 191 

It would have satisfied most women, but it 
did not satisfy Edith. She accepted the 
assurance of her husband's love and confidence 
with touching meekness and humility. Her 
pride was already in the dust — she could not 
be humble enough ; but she would not be moved 
from her decision. When he could prove her 
innocence before all the world she would return 
to him. She would not bring to him a tar- 
nished name. 

And so they parted. Derek Stanhope took 
his wife back to the old house at St. Oswald's 
that had been her home so long. He bid her 
farewell at the gates ; she did not ask him to 
enter, though the house was now her own. He 
left her with a benediction, with the tears 
shining in his eyes and his lips quivering. He 
was a dull, stupid fellow, but he loved her with 
a true man's love that no mistakes of hers could 
ever mar. 

Though she sent him away, it was she herself 
who was most unhappy. 



192 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

She shut herself up in the old house, as her 
aunt had done before her. Nobody visited her ; 
she would not have seen people if they had. 
She shut herself up between the high brick 
walls, and lived her solitary life, as old Miss 
Gunning had lived hers for sixty years. 

The dark wintry days went by, and the 
spring came and found her still there, living 
her sad, lonely life. She could have desired no 
punishment more than this, her own self- inflicted 
sentence, the voluntary expiation of her fault. 
But through all these weary days and weeks 
nothing had been heard of the missing necklet. 

Her knight-errant had not been idle; he had 
left no stone unturned to trace the lost 
diamonds, and he had oflered a big reward. 

He had not been working alone ; the detective 
Finch, whom Sir Bourchier had employed, had 
been working with him, and they had drawn 
the cordon of evidence into a very narrow circle. 
Every clue had been followed out, and every 
scrap of evidence had been sifted. There was 



'KNOCK IT DOWN!' 193 

only one conclusion to come to. If Edith 
Stanhope's husband had not been slow-witted, 
he would have arrived at it before. It was in 
keeping with the chivalry of his dull, honest 
nature to refuse to think evil of his enemies. 

' I am going down to Hereford to-morrow,' 
the detective said one day when he came to 
call upon him ; ' and I may go over to Nun- 
well. Have you any message for the ladies V 

' No,' he said ; ' no, I think not, except that 
you might tell Mrs. Tremlett that my wife is 
still at Gotham — that she still keeps to her 
determination not to return to me till the neck- 
lace is found.' 

Dora Tremlett knew this without telling. 
She had written to Edith regularly while she 
had been abroad — it had been her sole comfort 
and consolation to write to Edith — and she had 
begged her to leave her seclusion for a time, 
and come to her at Nunwell. 

She could not understand Edith's trouble ; 
compared to hers, it was a trouble light as air. 

VOL. II. 27 



194 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

What, was the condemnation of all the world to 
the undying stings of self-accusing conscience ? 
She would have given everything she possessed 
in the world to change places with her. 

The detective Finch went down to Hereford 
the next day, and drove over from there to 
Fryston. He did not go to Nunwell first to 
deliver his message ; he drove straight to 
Fryston. 

There were a great many people coming and 
going through the lodge gates on that day ; it 
was the day of the sale at the house. There 
were so many things to be sold, besides ' the 
costly and valuable modern and antique furni- 
ture,' as the auctioneers phrased it, that they 
could not all be sold in a day. The sale began 
with the outdoor things, the garden and the 
stable requisites, and moved by slow stages 
through the house. It had reached the boudoir 
on the third day — the room which Captain 
Tremlett had spent so much time preparing for 



' KNOCK IT DOWN !' 195 

the reception of his wife — the room where he 
had thrown the chairs and tables out of the 
window. The things from an adjoining room 
had been brought in there to be sold ; it was 
the room where the shocking event had hap- 
pened, and it was locked up from curious 
eyes. 

If Dora had been there with her shaken 
nerves, she would have declared that she had 
seen a ghost. The people who were gathered 
at the sale were only too anxious to see a 
ghost. It would have been a sight worth 
riding twenty miles — many of them had ridden 
twenty miles — to see. There was great compe- 
tition for the relics of the wretched man that 
were put up for sale. He might have been a 
saint, instead of a sinner, to see the way the 
people bid for mementos of him. His guns 
and riding- whips had fetched ridiculous prices 
in the gun-room below, and now the people 
were outbidding each other for his collar-boxes 
and his dressing-case. 



196 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

It was not a very handsome dressing-oase, 
though its fittings were silver. It had seen a 
good deal of service, and it was knocked about 
and shabby, and one of the brass handles was 
oif. It was an old-fashioned ebony dressing- 
case ; it might have belonged to his father. 
There was nothing in it to make the people 
bid for it as they were bidding. The com- 
petition was between two buyers : a Jew broker 
and a stranger to the neighbourhood. No one 
could understand why the broker was so 
anxious to possess the shabby old dressing- 
case. Allowing for the fittings being silver, 
he had already bidden twice the value of them, 
and he was still going on. He did not take 
his eyes once off the auctioneer during the 
bidding. His coarse, ugly red face was flushed, 
and his black beady eyes were bright and eager, 
and he could hardly keep his voice steady as he 
shouted out, ' Nineteen guineas !' 

* Nineteen and a half guineas ; shall I say 
even money — twenty guineas V the auctioneer 



' KNOCK IT DOWN i' 197 

asked in his engaging way. ' Twenty guineas, 
allow me ?' 

The Jew broker nodded — he could not trust 
himself to speak — and a fresh-coloured young 
man opposite nodded at the same moment. 

* Twenty-one guineas ! It's against you at 
twenty -one guineas. Twenty -two guineas, 
allow me V 

^ Bring it over here ; let me have one more 
look at it,' the young man bidding at the end 
of the table said, before he nodded his head. 

The dressing-case was brought over to him, 
and the company gathered round to look at it 
too. No one could see anything in it. The 
auctioneer himself had not a word to say to 
recommend it. He only poised his hammer, 
and smiled blandly, and murmured, * Allow 
me V 

The young man who was bidding such a 
ridiculous sum of money for the dressing-case 
did not examine it very closely — he only 
shook it. 



198 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

' Listen,' he said — ' listen ! there's something 
inside it.' 

' It's quite empty,' said the Jew broker in a 
thick voice ; ' there's nothing in it. It's only 
the fittings rattlin'.' 

A cold sweat had broken out and stood in 
great beads on his forehead while the young 
man at the table was turning over the dress- 
ing-case, and the colour had dropped suddenly 
out of his florid face. It had become quite 
livid, and his under lip was trembling ; he could 
not keep it steady. 

' It's something besides the fittings,' the man 
at the table said, appealing to the auctioneer. 
' Do you know if there is a secret drawer ?' 

The auctioneer shook his head. 

' The lot's to be sold as it is,' he said ; ' what- 
ever's inside it is sold with it.' 

He was growing impatient at the delay ; 
there were a great many lots yet to sell, and he 
wanted to get on. 

* Twenty-three guineas,' said the Jew hoarsely, 



♦KNOCK IT DOWN!' 199 

bidding on his own bid. ' Get on, mister. 
Knock it down !' 

* Twenty-four guineas !' 

The young man was bidding, to take up the 
time ; but at the same moment he was tapping 
the dressing-case, which he had got open, and 
all the silver fittings turned out on the table 
before him. He was tapping it with a chisel — 
he had come prepared with a chisel. It was 
not the first time he had examined the dressing- 
case ; he had found out the existence of that 
secret recess days ago, and he had come pre- 
pared with a chisel to assist in pursuing the 
investiofation. 

' I don't think we can waste time now,' said 
the auctioneer impatiently ; ' you should have 
found that out before. The things have been 
on view for three days. The sale must go on.' 

* Twenty-five guineas !' shouted the Jew. 
He could not restrain his excitement. He was 
trembling all over, and the sweat was running 
down his face. ' Knock it down, guv'ner ! 



200 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

Don't keep us waitin' here all day. Knock it 
down, before he smashes it to pieces !' 

' All right — twenty-six guineas !' the young 
man called out from the end of the table, but 
without looking up. 

He had got the chisel into a crevice, and 
something had moved. It had not moved very 
far, but it had moved. 

* Thirty guineas !' the Jew cried hoarsely. 
' Knock — it — down !' 

Something in his voice, or his manner, or his 
pale, flabby face, or the devouring eagerness in 
his eyes, arrested the fall of the hammer, and 
made the auctioneer pause. 

It would have fallen else ; for the man at 
the end of the table had forgotten to bid. He 
was so occupied shifting that unwilling panel 
by the aid of the chisel that he was blind and 
deaf to everything else. 

' No, Mr. Jacobs, we will not knock it 
down just yet,' the auctioneer said with his 
bland smile ; * we will wait and see what the 



'KNOCK IT DOWxN!' 201 

secret receptacle our friend has discovered 
contains.' 

He had not to wait lono-. 

The panel had slipped back. Amid breath- 
less silence, and with all eves fixed upon him, 
Finch, the detective, drew forth a packet from 
the hidden recess. 

He did not open it ; he passed it up to the 
auctioneer to open. 

It was the missing necklace ! 



CHAPTER XXVII. 

A SACRED CONVICTION. 

The news of the discovery of the lost necklace 
— the necklace that was supposed to have been 
stolen, that Captain Tremlett had taken away in 
a rage on his wedding-day — was known all over 
the world within twenty-four hours. Every- 
body had heard of its loss, and of the suspicion 
that had attached to the bridesmaid, and of 
the cruel charge that had been made. 

Society was hot and eager in its denunciation 
of the man who could have done this wicked, 
this inhuman act ; who, in a fit of pique, in 
revenge for some supposed slight of his valuable 
gift, had carried it away and hidden it, and. 



A SACRED CONVICTION 203 

out of sheer malice and jealousy of the influence 
of his wife's bosom friend, had brought this 
cruel charge. He had passed beyond the reach 
of the world's indignant censure. No voice of 
blame could reach him. Who would send a 
voice out into the darkness if it could ? 

The wretched stones which had been the 
occasion of so much misery to everybody went 
back to the family. Fortunately, they were 
heirlooms, and they went with the estates and 
the title. Dora would not accept the charge of 
them for a single day ; she would not have 
them in the house. 

' They have brought nothing but ill luck and 
unhappiness to their possessors,' she said, when 
they brought them to her. ' I would not have 
them again for the world !' 

Edith had ceased to hope anything, to expect 
anything, when the great news came that 
transformed her life. She was still living her 
dull life in the old house. She was much 
changed and shaken by all that she had gone 



204 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

through ; she was not the same Edith. She 
could not have gone through such an ordeal 
without being changed. Her failure and 
humiliation had taught her a hard lesson — a 
lesson that was worth learning. 

She learnt it alone, in the silence of the 
gloomy old house. The silence of the house 
was as unbroken now as in her aunt's time. 
The servants trod softly, the doors were closed 
without a sound, and the old creaking iron 
gates had seldom been opened since Miss 
Gunning was carried out. There was nothing 
to distract her, nothing to take off the remem- 
brance of the grief and the pain and the humilia- 
tion. She had plenty of time to remember. 
The silence and the desolation of the old house 
were part of her punishment. The gloomy 
reception-rooms were shut up ; no one ever used 
them now. The big sideboards and couches 
and the gilt filigree tables were all swathed in 
brown holland. 

Edith shut herself up, as her aunt had shut 



A SACRED CONVICTION 205 

herself up before her, in the bow-room, with 
the glass cases with the white cats ranged 
round the walls. One more had been added to 
the number since Miss Gunning's death. Blue- 
Eye's aunt looked down from her high place 
upon her with her shining eyes, and kept the 
past alive to her, if anything were wanting to 
keep it alive. 

Perhaps, if she had not had all these old 
associations always about her, she might have 
forgotten sometimes ; if she had admitted any 
new interests, the livhig joys of others, the 
hopes and interests that lay beyond this closed, 
narrow life. But she wanted to remember ; it 
was the expiation of her fault that she had 
imposed on herself Only suffering could have 
healed the hurt her folly had wrought. Pain 
had not been unwelcome ; she had accepted it 
as part of her life. 

It had been all very well, this sadness and 
•silence and suffering, during the dull winter 
days, when Nature was in sympathy with her 



2o6 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

mood ; but when spring came, and the mists 
melted away, and the earth was breaking up 
and bursting into life ; when the skies were blue 
overhead, and there was a riot of birds in the 
trees, then it was different. Her heart was 
stirred in these sweet spring days with a 
remembrance of other thinofs — thinp^s she had 
put away from her — and the penance, the pangs 
of shame and remorse and bitter regret, became 
irksome to her. The time of singing birds had 
come, and she could not always be eating her 
heart out in silence. 

The release came to her when she was least 
expecting it. She was sitting in her aunt's high- 
backed chair, in the old room, with her head 
leaning against the brass fire-guard, as Miss 
Gunning used to lean her head in the old days ; 
there was still a small fire burning in the grate, 
for Edith was always chilly now. The warmth 
of her life had never come back to her. The 
cats were her sole companions ; they were look- 
ing down upon her from the walls with their 



A SACRED CONVICTION 207 

glassy eyes, and the one little remaining white 
morsel was curled up in her lap ; she did not 
know what she should have done without Blue- 
Eye. 

One must have something, if it is only a cat, 
to stroke — something to cuddle into one's 
arms, and rub its damp nose against one's 
cheek. 

She was getting more like her aunt every 
dav, she told herself, sittino^ there with Blue- 
Eye curled up in her lap ; soon she would grow 
like her in other ways. This hopeless separa- 
tion, these memories of tenderest love, the 
dreams of what might have been — what had 
been— the devotion that had triumphed over 
suspicion and guilt, that she had put away 
from her, were more than she could bear. 

If her husband did not come soon, and put 
an end to the suspense and the pain, her mind 
would give way, as Miss Gunning's had done. 
If he did not come soon, he would come too 
late. 



208 THE TREMLKTT DIAMONDS 

She could bear the suspense no longer ; the 
air of the room was stifling her, and she got up 
quickly and went out. 

It was late on the afternoon of the sale at 
Fryston that the dressing-case had been put 
up, and there had been the delay of opening it, 
and the wonder of finding the missing neck- 
lace. 

The wonder did not prevent a messenger 
being sent off at once to the nearest telegraph 
office, and the message being flashed up to 
town. It had reached towm, it was in Captain 
Stanhope's hands, before the wonder had 
abated. 

He did not lose any time. He never knew 
how he got out of the house, and flung himself 
into a hansom, and incited the driver, with 
promises of a fabulous reward, to drive madly 
to the station ; how he caught the train as it 
was steaming out of the station ; how he 
reached St. Oswald's before the dusk had 
fallen, and presented himself at Gotham House. 



A SACRED CONVICTION 209 

It was still light when he shook the iron 
gates of the old house, and the rusty, disused 
lock gave way as he shook them, and the gates 
fell open before him. He did not walk straight 
up to the front-door of the house ; his heart 
was beating so fast that he stopped beside an 
old sundial, half liidden among the shrubs, to 
ofet breath. 

There was a strano-e lioht in the skv ; the 
scarlet and the gold of the sunset had faded, 
and left a suppressed yet beautiful lilac glow. 
The mists were risino- in the old tancrled Sfarden 
beyond the house, where the pear-trees were 
visible in their white and the apple-trees were 
in bloom. 

What was this apparition coming towards 
him out of the white misty silence ? — A droop- 
ing figure with a sad, stately grace, and sable 
skirts trailing behind her. 

He could not be sure that he was not dream- 
ing as he stood there, that his fancy had not 
VOL. II. 28 



2(0 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

played him false ; but the soft footsteps on the 
gravel were coming nearer. 

Edith had come out for a breath of air ; she 
could no longer breathe in that close room, with 
those sad memories pressing upon her, and she 
had come out into the air. No one ever walked 
in that old deserted garden ; she was alone 
with the sundial and the apple-trees, with the 
spring flowers pushing out in the borders, 
and the sweet lilac glow of the twilight about 
her. 

It was here her husband met her. 

' My darling ! my darling !' 

It was the old cry. He could not say any 
more ; he could not explain. He could only 
hold out his arms and murmur the old tender 
words. 

Edith did not need to be told ; she read his 
message in his eyes. She could not mistake 
their message. She did not need to see the 
telegram he held crushed up in his hands. She 
would rather read her deliverance in his eyes. 



A SACRED CONVICTION 211 

It was a wonderful moment. It was more 
than a moment : it held the bliss of a lifetime. 
Time seemed to have stood still. She forgot 
in that sudden supreme joy the anguish and 
the despair, the gloom and the bitterness, of 
the past months. 

' Did you think me guilty, Derek ?' Edith 
asked shyly, when she could speak at all. 
'You may tell me noiv. Did you ever think 
me guilty, dear V 

' Guilty V 

His dull, stupid face was very noble and 
tender ; the light of his great love, of his kind, 
loyal heart, was shining in his eyes. He could 
not dissemble with her in that moment. 

' What had your guilt to do with me ?' he 
said, drawing her to him ; ' if I had hioivn you 
were guilty, it would not have affected my love 
— it would have made no difference.' 

There had been a silver lining to the dark 
cloud that had overshadowed her all the time ; 
but only after long doubt and sorrow had Edith 



212 THE TREMLETT DIAMONDS 

come to the knowledge of a truth she ought 
never to have doubted— the best certainty 
amid the mistakes and failures of her life— the 
sacred conviction of her husband's love. 



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by Hi 



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The Poetical 'Works of Alexander Pope. 
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Well Then. 
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Dorothy Forster. 

By ROBERT Br CHAN AN 



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Foxglove Manor. 
Master of the Mine. 
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After Dark. 

No Name. 

Antonina. 

Basil. 

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The Dead Secret. 

Queen of Hearts. 

My Miscellanies. 

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The Moonstone. 

Man and Wife. 

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Paul Foster s Daughter. 

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Geoffory Hamilton. 

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Ky C. EGBERT CRABDOCK. 
Kii Vanished Star. 

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Romances of the Old Seraglio. 

By IIIATT CRI.II. 
Adventures of a Fair Rebel. 

By B. .11. CROKER. 
Diana Barrington. A Bird of Passage. 

Proper Pride. i "To Let." 

A Family Likeness. I Outcast of the People. 
Pretty Miss NevUle. I 

By WII.CIAM ClTPIiES. 
Hearts of Gold. 

By A1.PIIONSE BA UBET. 
The Evangelist ; or, Port Salvation. 
By II. COIiE.lIAN BAVIBSO.".'. 
Mr. Sadler s Daughters. 

By ERAS;TIUS DAWSON. 
The Fountain of Youth. 

By JA.IIES BE ITHIiliE. 
A Castle in Spain. 

By J. 1.EIT1I BE R WE NT. 
Our Lady of Tears, | Circe s Lovers 



28 



CHATTO & WINDUS, PUBLISHERS, PICCADILLY. 



The Piccadilly (3/6) Novels— co»(iMMed. 
By DICK DONOVAIV. 

Tracked to Doom. | Man from Manchester. 

Ry A. CONAN DOY1.E. 

The Firm of Girdlettone. 

.S . JE AIVIVETTE 1>U!V€AIV. 

A Daughter of To day. | Vernon's Aunt. 

By lYIrs. ANrVI£ £I»\VAJRDE8. 

Archie Lovell. 

By O. JMAIVVII.I.E FEIVN. 
The New Mistress. I The Tiger Lily. 

Witness to the Deed. | The White Virgin. 

By PEKCIT FITZOERAL.I>. 

Fatal Zero. 

By K. E. FKANCII.I.OIV. 

One by One. I King or Knave 7 

A Dog and his Shadow. Ropes of Sand. 

A Real Queen. | Jaclt Doyle's Daughter. 

Piof.bySirBABTJLE FRERE. 

Fandurang Hart. 

By EBWABB OARRETT. 

The Capel Girls. 

By l»AUri OAIJJLOT. 

The Red Shirts. 

By €IIARr.ES OIBBOIV. 

Robin Gray. I The Golden Shaft. 

Loving a Dream. | Of High Degree. 

By E. OliAIVVIIiliE. 

The Lost Heiress. I The Fossicker. 

A Fair Colonist. | 

Bv E. J. OOOBMAIV. 

The Fate of Herbert Wayne. 

By CECir. ORIFFITII. 

Corinthia Marazion. 

By SlfBJVEY GBUIVJOY. 

The Days of his Vanity. 

By THOITIAS HARBV. 

Under the Greenwood Tree. 



By BRET HARTE. 



Susy. 

Sally Dows. 
A Protegee 

Hamlin e. 
BellRinger of Angel s. 
Clar«nce. 



of Jack 



Beatrix Randolph. 

David Poindexter s Dis- 
appearance. 

The Spectre of the 
Camera 



A Waif of the Plains 
A Ward of the Golden 

Gate. 
A Sappho of Green 

Springs. 
Col. Starbottle's Client. 

By JUliIAIV HA^VTHOR!VE 

Garth. 

inUce Qucntln. 

Sebastian Strome. 

Dust. 

Fortune's Fool. 

By Sir A. HEI^PS. 
Ivan de Blron. 

By 1. HEIVBERSOIV. 
Agatha Page. 

By G. A. IIEIVTV. 
Rujub the Juggler. | Dorothy's Double. 

By JOIirV HULL. 
The Common Ancestor. 

By JYlis. Hi;iV<;^ERFOKU. 

Lady Verner's Flight. | The Red-House Mystery. 

By ITlrs. A1.FREB IIIJIVT. 

The Leaden Casket. I Self Condemned. 
That Other Person. | Mrs. Juliet. 

By CUTCM.IFFE UYIVE. 
Honour of Thieves. 

By R. ASHE KING. 
A Drawn Game. 
<• The Wearing of the Gr«ea. 



The Piccadilly (3/6) Novei^s— continued. 

By EBITIOIVB r.EPEL.L.ETIER. 

Madame Sans-Gene. 

By HARRY L.1NDSAY. 
Rhoda Roberts. 

By E. I.YIVIV I.IIVTON. 



Patricia Eemball. 

Under which Lord 7 

" My Love!" 

lone. 

Paston Carew. 

By ir. ^V. IaVVV, 
Gideon Fleyce. 



Sowing the Wind. 
The Atonement of Learn 

Dundas. 
The World Well Lost. 
The Ons Too Many. 



By J LSTIIV lTIcCARTHY\ 



A Fair Saxon. 
I inley Rochford. 
Miss Misanthrope, 
Donna Quixote. 
Maid of Athens. 
Camlola. 



Waterdalo Neighbour!. 
My Enemy s Daughter. 
Red Diamonds. 
Dear Lady Disdain. 
The Dictator. 
The Comet of a Season. 



By GEORGE JTIACI>0.\A1.I>. 

Heather and Snow. | Phantastes. 

By ij. T. ITIEABE. 
A Soldier of Fortune. 

By BERTRAITI MITFORI). 

The Gun-Runner. I The King s Assegai. 

The Luck of Gerard Renshaw Fanning'! 
Ridgelcy. | Quest. 

By J. E. ITirODOCK. 
Maid Marian and Robin Hood. 
By I>. CHRISTIE MURRAV. 



A Life's Atonement. 

Joseph's Coat. 

Coals of Fire. 

Old Blazer 8 Hero. 

Val Strange. 1 Hearts. 

A Model Father. 

By the 6a,te of the Sea. 

A Bit of Human Nature. 



First Person Singular. 
Cynic Fortune. 
The Way of the World. 
BobMartln's Little Girl. 
Time's Revenges. 
A Wasted Crime. 
In Direst Peril. 
Mount Despair. 



By MURRAV & HERMAN. 

The Bishops' Bible. I Paul Jones's Alias. 
One Traveller Returns. | 

By HUME NISBET. 
" Bail Up I " 

By ^Y. E. NORRIS. 
Saint Ann s. 

By G. OIIIVET. 
A Weird Gift. 

By OUIBA. 



Held in Bondage. 

Strathmore. 

Chandos. 

Under Two Flags. 

Idalia. 

Cecil Castlemaines 

Gage. 
Tricotrln. 
Puck. 

FoUe Farine. 
A Dog of Flanders 
Pascarel. 
Sii^na. 

Princess Napraxine. 
Ariadne. 

By MARGARET A. PAUIi. 
Gentle and Simple. 

By JAMES PAVIV. 
Lost Sir Massingbcrd. High Spirits. 
Less Black than We're \ Under One Roof. 

Painted. 
A Confidential Agent. I 
A Grape from a Thorn. 
In Peril and Privation. 
The Mystery of Mir 

bridge. 
The Canon's Ward. 
Waller 3 Word. 
By Prosy. 



Two Little Wooden 

Shoes. 
In a Winter City. 
Friendship. 
Moths. 
Ruffino. 
Pipistrello. 
A Village Commune. 
Bimbi. 
Wanda. 

Frescoes. | Othmar. 
In Maremma. 
Syrlin. | Guildcroy. 
Santa Barbara. 
Two Offenders. 



From Exile. 
Glow-worm Tales. 
The Talk of the Town. 
Holiday Tasks. 
For Cash Only. 
The Burnt Million. 
The Word and the Will 
Sunny Stories. 
A Trying Patient. 



CHATTO & WINDUS, PUBLISHERS, PICCADILLY. 



29 



The Piccadilly (3/6) KovELs—contiitued. 

By ITIrs. CAJIPBEt,Jj PKAEI>. 

Outlaw and Lawmaker. | Ciiristina Chard. 

By E. C. PKICE. 

Valentina. I Mrs. Lancaster's Rival. 

The Foreigner!. I 

By RI€RIAKI> PRYCE. 

Miss Maxwell's Affections. 

By CIIARI.es READE. 

It is Never Too Late to ; Singleheart andDoable- 

Mend. | face. 

The Double Marriage. Good Stories of Men 
Love Me Little, Love and other Animals. 

Me Long. Hard Cash. 

The Cloister and the Peg Wofflngton. 

Hearth. Christie Johnstone. 

The Course of True ] Griffith Gaunt. 

Love. Foul Play. 

The Autobiography of The Wandering Heir. 

a Thief. A Woman-Hater. 

Put Yourself in His A Simpleton. 

Place. A Perilous Secret. 

A Terrible Temptation. Readiana. 
The Jilt. 

By ITIrs. J. II. RII>»EL.£i. 
Weird Stories. 

By A3IEL.IE RIVES. 
Barbara Dering. 

By F. W. ROBIIVSOIV. 

The Hands of Justice. 

By BORA RUSSEJLIi. 

A Country Sweetheart. 

By ^V. CTiARK RIj.«i«Er.I.. 

Ocean Tragedy. I Alone onWideWide Sea. 

My Shipmate Louise. | The Phantom Death. 
By JOaix\ SAUIVBERS. 

Guy Waterman. I The Two Dreamers. 

Bound to the Wheel. | The Lion in the Path. 

By KATHARIIVE SAUIVBER.-^. 

Margaret and Elizabeth I Heart Salvage. 
Gideon's Rock. | Sebastian. 

The High Mills. 



The Piccadilly (3/6) Kovels— continued. 

By HATVliEY SMART. 

Without Love or Licence. 

By T. ^V. SPEIOHT. 

A Secret of the Sea. 

By R. A. STERIVBALE. 

The Afghan Knife. 

By BERTHA TIIOITIAS. 

Proud Maisie. 1 The 'Violin-Player. 

By AIVTIIOIVV TROr.I.OPE. 

The Way we Live Now. I Scarborough's Family. 
Frau Frohmann. | The Land-Leaguers. 

By FRAIVCES E. TROEl.OPE. 

Like Ships upon the I Anne Fumess. 
Sea. I Mabel's Progress. 

By IVAN TITROENIEFF, Ac. 

Stories from Foreign Novelists. 

By IVIARK TWAIN. 

The American Claimant. [ Tom Sawyer Abroad. 
The£l,000,030Bank-note. | Pudd'nhead Wilson. 

By C. C. FRASER-TYTEER. 

Mistress Judith. 

By SARAH TVTEER. 

Lady Bell. I The Blackhall Ghosts. 

The Bride's Pass. The Macdonald Lass. 

Buried Diamonds. | 

By AEEEN UPWABB. 

The Queen against Owen. 
The Prince of Balkistan. 

By E. A. VIZETEEEY. 
The Scorpion : A Romance of Spain. 

By .1. S. WINTER. 
A Soldier s Children. 

By ITS A RC; ARE T WVNIUAN. 
My Flirtations. 

By E. ZOEA. 
The Downfall. I Dr. Pascal. 

The Dream. j Money. ] Loordes. 



CHEAP EDITIONS OF POPULAR NOVELS. 

Post 8vo, illustrated boards, Ss. each. 



By ARTE3IUS WARD. 

Artemus Ward Complete. 

By EI>:^IONB ABOUT. 
The Fellah. 

By IIAMIETON AIBE. 

Carr of Carrlyon. 1 Confidences. 

By ITIARY ALBERT. 

Brooke Finchley's Daughter. 

By Mrs. AEEXANBER. 

Maid, Wife or Widow 7 | "Valerie s Fate. 

By GRANT AEEEN. 



Strange Stories. 

Philistia. 

Babylon. 

The Devil's Die. 

This Mortal Coil. 

In all Shades. 

The Beckoning Hand. 

Blood Royal. 



For Maimie's Sake. 
The Tents of Shem. 
The Great Taboo. 
Dumaresq s Daughter. 
Th9 Duchess of Powys- 

land. 
IvanGreet'sMasterpiece. 
The Scallywag. 



By E. EESTEB ARNOED. 

Phra the Phoenician. 

By AEAN ST. AUBVN. 

A Fellow of Trinity. I Master of St.Benedlct s 
The Junior Dean. | To His Own Master. 

By Rev. S. BARINO OOUED. 

Bed Spider. | Eva. 



By FRANK BARRETT. 



Fettered for Life. 
Little Lady Linton. 
Between Life & Death. 
The Sin of Olga Zassoa- 

lich. 
Folly Morrison. 
Lieut. Barnabas 



Honest Davie. 
A Prodigal's Progress. 
Found Guilty. 
A Recoiling "Vengeance. 
For Love and Honour. 
John Ford; and His 
Helpmate. 

BEAECHAMP. 



SHEESEEIT 

Grantley Grange. 

By ^VAETER BESANT. 

For Faith and Freedom. 



Dorothy Forster. 

Children of Gibeon. 

Uncle Jack. 

Herr Paulus. 

All Sorts and Condi- 
tions of Men. 

The Captains Room. 

All in a Garden Fair. 

The World Went 'Very 
Well Then. 



T-) CaU Her Mine. 

The BeU of St. Paul's. 

Armorel of Lyonesse. 

The Holy Rose. 

The Ivory Gate. 

Sf . Katherine s by the 

Tower. 
'Verbena Camellia. 
The Rebel Queen. 

By W. BESANT & J. RIt'E. 



This Son of 'Vulcan. 
My Little Girl. 
Ttie Case of Mr. Lucraft. 
The Golden Butterfly. 
By Celia s Arbour. 
The Monks of Thelema. 
The Seamy Side. 



The Ten Years' Tenant. 
Ready-Money Mortiboy 
With Hai-p and Crown. 
'Twaa in Trafalgar* 

Bay. 
The Chaplain of th« 

Floet, 



30 



CHATTO & WINDUS, PUBLISHERS, PICCADILLY. 



Two-Shilling Hovels— continued. 
«v AiTIBROiiiE BIERVE. 

In the Midst of Life. 

Ky FK£I>£RICK ROYTiE. 

Camp Notes. I Chronicles of No-man's 

Savage Life. | Land. 

By RRET HARTK. 

Callfomian Stories. ( Flip. I Maruja. 

Gabriel Conroy. \ APhylllsofI he Sierras. 

The Lucli of Roaring ! A Waif of the Plains. 

Camp. I A Ward of the Golden 

An Heiress of Red Dog. I Gate. 

Ry HAROLD RRir]><;iEH. 
Uncle Sam at Home. 

Ry rori<:rt rl<;iiaiv,%iv. 

Shadow of the Sword. 
A Child of Nature. 



The Martyrdom of Ma- 
deline. 
Annan Water. 
The New Abelard. 
Matt. 

The Heir of Linne. 
, tJAIIVE. 
The Deemster. 



Rod and the Man. 
love Me for Ever. 
Foxglove Manor. 
The Master of the Mine 

Ry IIAl.l. 
The Shadow of a Crime. I 
A Son of Hagar. | 

Ry C'oiiininiKln- CAMERON. 
The Cruise of the "Black Prince." 
Ry lUis. I.OVJETT CAIUKROIV. 
Deceivers Ever. | Juliet's Guardian. 

Ry AUSTIIV C1.AR£. 
For the Love of a Lass. 

Ry lTli'8. ARCHER CI.IVE. 
Paul FerroU. 
Why Paul Ferroll Killed his Wife. 

Ry MACtiAREIV CORRAN. 
The Cure of Souls. | The Red Sultan. 

Rv €. AI.I.STON C01.I..1IVS. 
The Bar Sinister. 
ITIORT. & FRANCES COl.l.lIVS. 



Sweet Anne Page. 
Transmigration. 
Fiom Midnight to Mid 

night. 
A Fight with Fortune. 

Ry ^VILillIE COIiLINS 



Sweet and Twenty. 
The Village Comedy. 
You Play me False. 
Blacksmith and Scholar 
Frances. 



My Miscellanies. 
The Woman in White. 
The Moonstone. 
Man and Wife. 
Poor Miss Finch. 
The Fallen Leaves. 
Jezebel's Daughter 
The Black Robe. 
Heart and Science. 
"I Say No I" 
The Evil Genins. 
Little Novels. 
Legacy of Cain. 
Blind Love. 



Armadale. 

After Dark. 

No Name. 

Antonina. 

Basil. 

Hide and Seek. 

The Dead Secret. 

Queen of Hearts. 

Miss or Mrs. ? 

The New Magdalen. 

The Frozen Deep. 

The Lav/ and the Lady. 

The Two Destinies. 

The Haunted Hotel. 

A Rogue's Life. 

Ry JTI. .1. COI.QUHOUIV. 
Every Inch a Soldier. 

Ry RUTTOIV COOK. 
I,eo. I Paul Foster's Daughter. 

Ry C. ECJRERT CRA1>I>04;ii. 
The Prophet of the Great Smoky Mountains. 

RylTIATT CRllU. 
Adventures of a Fair Rebel. 

Ry R. 111. CROKER. 
Pretty Miss Nevill. I Bird of Passage. 

Diana Barrington. Proper Pride. 

"To Let." I A Family Likeness. 

Ry ^V. ClTPl^ES. 
Hearts of Gold. 

Ry AliPHONSE I>AUI>ET. 
The Evangelist ; or, Port Salvation. 

By ERASITIUS DAWSOIV. 
The Fountain of Youth. 



From Information Re- 
ceived. 

Tracked to Doom. 

Link by Link 

Suspicion Aroused. 

Dark Deeds. 

The Long Arm of the 
Law. 



Two-Shilling Novei^s— continued. 
Ry .fAIVIES DE ITIIL.I.E. 

A Castle in Spain. 

Ry .J. T.EITH RERWEIVT. 

Our Lady of Tears. | Circe s Lovers. 
Ry CI1ARL.EN OICKEIVS. 

Sketches by Boz. I Nicholas Nickleby. 

Oliver Twiat. | 

Ry RICK ROIVOVAIV. 
Tlie Man-Hunter. 
Tracked and Taken. 
Caught at Last I 
Wanted I 
Who Poisoned Hetty 

Duncan 7 
Man from Manchester. 
A Detective's Triumphs 
In the Grip of the Law. 

Ry illrs. AIVIVIE ER WARREN. 
A Point of Honour. | Archie Lovell. 

Ry ITI. RETHAH-ED WARDS. 
Felicia. I Kitty. 

Ry ED^V. EOGLiESTON. 
Roxy. 

Ry a. ITIANVirL,E FEIVN. 
The New Mistress. | Witness to the Deed. 
Ry PERCY FITZf^^ERAI.D. 
Bella Donna. I Second Mrs. Tillotson. 

Never Forgotten. Seventy - five Brooke 

Polly. Street. 

Fatal Zero. | The Lady of Brantome 

Ry P. FITZ<;:ERAI.D and others. 
Strange Secrets. 

ACRAIVY DE FOIVRL.ANQUE. 
Filthy Lucre. 

Ry U. E. FRAIVCII.l,OIV. 



Olympia. 
One by One. 
A Real Queen. 
Queen Cophetua. 



King or Knave ? 
Romances of the Law. 
Ropes of Sand. 
A Dog and his Shadow. 



Ry HAROI.D FREDERICK. 

Seth's Brother s Wife. | The Lawton Girl. 
Pic#. by Sir RARTJLE FRERE. 
Pandurang Hari. 

Ry HAIIV FRISWEL.L.. 
One of Two. 

Ry EDWARD GARRETT. 
The Capel Girls. 

Ry <^II.RERT GAUI.. 
A Strange Manuscript. 

Ry CHARLES GIRRO.'V. 



In Honour Bound. 
Flower of the Forrst. 
The Braes of Yarrow. 
The Golden Shaft. 
Of High Degree. 
By Mead and Stream. 
Loving a Dream. 
A Hard Knot. 
Heart's Delight. 
Blood-Money. 



Robin Gray. i 

Fancy Free. 
For Lack of Gold. ' 

What will the World 

Say? 
In Love and War. 
For the King. 
In Pastures Green. 
Queen of the Meadow. 
A Heart's Problem. 
The Dead Heart. 

Ry IVILLIAITI OILRERT. 
Dr. Austin's Guests. I The Wizard of tho 
James Duke. | Mountain. 

Ry ERIVEST OL.A!VVff LI.Y<:. 
The Lost Heiress. I The Fossicker. 

A Fair Colonist. | 

Ry HEIVRY OREVILLE. 
A Noble Woman. | Nikanor. 

Ry CECIL GRIFFITH. 
Corinthia Marazion. 

Ry SYDNEY" GRUI^'DY^ 
The Days of his 'Vanitv. 

Ry JOHN HARRERTON. 
Bruetons Bayou | Country Luck. 

Ry ANDRE^V IIALJLIDAY. 
Every-day Papers. 

Ry La<ly DUFF US HARDY. 
Paul Wynter'g Sacrlflco, 



CHATTO 8c WiNDUS, PUBLISHERS, PICCADILLY. 



31 



Two-Shilling Novels— continued. 
By TI103IAS HARDY. 

Under the Greenwood Tree. 

fly J. BERWICK. If ARWOOD. 

The Tenth Earl. 
By JU1.IAIV IIA\*^TIIOR.XJE. 



Garth. 

Ellice Qnentin. 

Fortune's Fool. 

Miss Cadogna. 

Sebastian Strome. 

Dust. 



Beatrix Randolph. 
Love — or a Name. 
David Poindexter's Dis- 



appearance. 
The Spectre 
Camera. 



of the 



By Sir ARTHUR IIEI.PS. 

Ivan de Biron. 

By HE.-VRY HERITIAIV. 

A Leading Lady. 

By IIEAI>Oi\ IIIIiL.. 

Zambra the Detective. 

By JOHIV Illlili. 

Treason Felony. 

By ITIis. CASHEIi HOEY. 

The Lover's Creed. 

By ITIi-8. OEORGE HOOPER. 

The Hoose of Eaby. 

By TIGHE HOPKINS. 

Twlxt Love and Duty. 

By Itlrs. HtllVOERFORO. 

A Maiden all Forlorn. I A Mental Straggle. 
In Durance 'Vile. A Modem Circe. 

Marvel. I Lady 'Verner s Fli?ht. 

By ITIrs. AL.FREI> IIinVT. 
Thomlcrofts Model. | Self-Condemned, 
'mat Other Person. | The Leaden Casket. 

By JEAN INOEI.OM\ 
Fated to be Free. 

By W.^I. JAilIESON. 
My Dead Self. 

By HARRIETT .TAV. 
The Dark Colleen. | Queen of Connaught. 

By ITIARK KERS5IA1V. 
Colonial Facts and Fictions. 

By R. ASHE KING. 
A Drawn Game. l Passion s Slave 

'■ The Wearing of the Bell Barry. 
Green." I 

By JOHN LEVS. 
The Lindsays. 

By E. liYNN LINTON. 
Patricia Kemball. The Atonement of Leam 



Tne World Well Lost 
Under which Lord 7 
Paston Carew. 
'■ My Love I' 
lone. 

By HENRY W. r,L€Y. 
Gideon Fleyce. 

By ji'STiN McCarthy 



Dundas. 
With a Silken Thread. 
The Eebel of the 

Family. 
Sowing the Wind. 



Camiola. 

Donna Quixote. 

Maid of Athens. 

The Comet of a Season. 

The Dictator. 

Red Diamonds. 



Dear Lady Disdain. 
Waterdale Neighbours. 
Mv Enemy's Daughter. 
A Fair Saxon. 
Linley Rochford. 
Miss Misanthrope. 

By iiuoea JIA.VVOL.L,. 

Mr. Stranger s Sealed Packet. 

By AGNES illACDONEI^I.. 

Quaker Cousins. 

KATHARINE S. ITIACQUOID 

The Evil Eye. | Lost Rose. 

By ^V. II. ITIAl,I.OCK. 

A. Romance of the Nine- 1 The New Republic. 
Ueoth Century. i 



Two-Shilling Novels— continued. 
By FLORENCE ITIARRYAT. 



A Harvest of Wild Oats. 
Written in Fire. 



Open ! Sesame I 
Fighting the Air. 

By J. itlASTERlTIAN. 

Half-a-dozen Daughters. 

By BRANDER MATTHEWS. 

A Secret of the Sea. 

By LEONARD MERRICK. 

The Man who was Good. 

Ry JEAN MIDDLE MASS. 

Touch and Go. | Mr. DorilUon. 

By Mm. MOLESWORTH. 

Hathercourt Rectory. 

By J. E. MUDDOCK. 

Stories Weird and Won- I From the Bosom of tho 

deriul. Deep. 

The Dead Man's Secret. | 

By MCRKAY and IIER.IIAN. 
One Traveller Returns. 1 The Bishops' Bible. 
Paul Jones s Alias. | 

By D. CHRISTIE MURRAY. 



A Life s Atonement. 
By the Gate of the Sea. 
A Bit of Human Nature. 
First Person Singular. 
Bob Martin's Little 

Girl. 
Time s Revenges. 
A Wasted Crime. 



A Model Father. 

Joseph's Coat. 

Coals of Fire. 

■Val Strange. 

Old Blazer s Hero. 

Hearts. 

The Way of the World. 

Cynic Fortune. 

By HENRY MURRAY. 
A Game of Bluff. | A Song of Sixpence. 

By HUME NISBET. 
" Bail Up I " I Dr.Bernard St. Vincent. 

By ALICE O'lIANLON. 
The Unforeseen. | Chance ? or Fate 7 

By GEORGES OIINET. 
Dr. Rameau. I A Weird Gift. 

A Last Love. | 

By Mrs. Ol^IPHANT. 
Whiteladies. I The Greatest Heiress in 

The Primrose Path. | England. 

By Mis. ROBERT O'REILLY. 
Phoebe s Fortunes. 

By OUIDA. 



Held in Bonda;^ 

Strathmore. 

Chandos. 

IdaUa. 

Under Two Flags. 

Cecil Castlemaine'sGage 

Tricotrin. 

Puck. 

Folle Farine. 

A Dog of Flanders. 

Pascarel. 

Signa. 

Princess Napraxine. 

In a Winter City. 

Ariadne. 

Friendship. 



Two Little Wooden 

Shoes. 
Moths. 
Bimbi. 
Pipiatrello. 
A 'Village Commune, 
Wanda. 
Othmar. 
Frescoes. 
In Maremma. 
Guilderoy. 
Ruffino. 
Syrlin. 

Santa Barbara. 
Ouidas Wisdom, 

and Pathos. 



Wit, 



MARGARET AGNES PAUL. 

Gentle and Simple. 

By C. L. PIRKIS. 

Lady Lovelace. 

By EDGAR A. POE. 

The Mystery of Marie Roget. 

By Mr*. CAMPBELL PRAED. 

The Romance of a Station. 
The Soul of Countess Adrian. 
Outlaw and Lawmaker. 

By E. C. PRICE. 
'Valentina. I Mrs. Lancaster's RivaL 

The Foreigners. | Gerald. 

By RICHARD PRYCE. 
Waa li&zwell'a ASections. 



CHATTO 8c WINDUS, PUBLISHERS, PICCADILLY. 



32 



Two-Shilling Novels— co«/i«»/erf. 
By JAIYIES PAYN. 

Bentinck's Tutor. Talk of the Town. 

Murphy s Master. Holiday Tasks 

A County Family. A Perfect Treasure 

At Her Mercy. 

Cecil 8 Tryst. 

The Clyffards of Clyffe 

The Foster Brothers. 



Found Dead. 

The Best of Husbands. 

Walter's Word. 

Halves. 

Fallen Fortunes. 

Humorous Stories. 

£200 Reward. 

A Marine Residence. 

Mirk Abbey. 

By Proxy. 

Under One Roof. 

High Spirits. 

Carlyon's Year. 

From Exile. 

For Cash Only. 

Kit. 

The Canon's Waid. 



What He Cost Her. 
A Confidential Agent. 
Glowworm Tales. 
The Burnt Million. 
Sunny Stories. 
Lost Sir Massmgberd. 
A Woman's 'Vengeance. 
The Family Scapegrace. 
Gwendoline's Harvest. 
Like Father, Like Son. 
Married Beneath Him. 
Not Wooed, but Won. 
Less Black than We're 

Painted. 
Some Private Views. 
A Grape from a Thorn. 
The Mystery of Mir- 

brldge. 
The Word and the Will. 
A Prince of the Blood. 
A Trying Patient. 



By CIEARIili:!^^ REABE. 

It Is Never Too Late to A Terrible Temptation. 

Foul Play. 

The Wandering Heir. 

Hard Cash. 

Singleheart and Double- 
face. 

Good Stories of Men and 
other Animals. 



Mend 
Christie Johnstone. 
The Double Marriage. 
Put Yourself in His 

Place. 
Love Me Little, Love 

Me Long. 
The Cloister and the 

Hearth. 
The Course of True 

Love. 
The Jilt. 
The Autobiography of 

a Thief. 

By Mrs. J. II. RIBBEI.I 



Peg Wof&ngton. 

Griffith Gaunt. 

A Perilous Secret. 

A Simpleton. 

Readiana. 

A WomanHater. 



The Uninhabited House 
The Mystery in Palace 

Gardens. 
The Nun's Curse. 
Idle Tales. 



Weird Stories 
Fairy Water. 
Her Mother's Darling. 
The Prince of Wales s 
Garden Party. 

By AlTlElilE RIVEJ^. 
Barbara Dering. 

By F. W. ROBINSON. 
Women are Strange. | The Hands of Justice. 

By JAiUES RUIVCIIIIAJV. 
Skippers and Shellbacks. 
Grace Balmaign's Sweetheart. 
Bchools and Scholars. 

By W. CliARK BUSSEfili. 
Round the Galley Fire. The Romance of Jenny 
On the Fo k sle Head. Harlowe. 

In the Middle Watch. An Ocean Tragedy. 
A 'Voyage to the Cape. My Shipmate Louise. 
A Book for the Ham- Alone on a Wide Wide 

mock. , ^^ Sea. 

The Mystery of the 

•Ocean Star." 
OEOiB«;}E AUGUSTUS SAIiA. 
Gaslight and Daylight. 

By JOHN SAUNBERS. 
Guy Waterman. I The Lion in the Path. 

The Two Dreamers. | 
By KATHARINE SAUNDERS. 
Joan Merryweather. I Sebastian. *' 

The High Mills. Margaret and EUza- 

Heart Salvage. I beth. 

By GEOROE R. SII^IS 



Rogues and "Vagabonds. 
The Ring o Bells. 
Mary Jane's Memoirs. 
M«ry Jane Married. 
Talcs of Today. 
Dramas of Life. 



Tinkletop's Crime. 

Zeph. 

My Two Wives. 

Memoirs of a Landlady. 

Scenes from the Show. 



Tv/o-Shilling Novels — continued. 
By ARTHUR SK.ETCHI.EV. 

A Match in the Dark. 

By IIAWL.EY SlIABT. 

Without Love or Licence. 

By T. W, SPEIOHT. 

The Mysteries of Heron Back to Life. 



The LoudwaterTragc dy. 
Burgo 8 Romance. 
Quittance in Full. 



Dyke. 
The Golden Hoop. 
Hoodwinked. 
By Devious Ways. 

By R. A. STERNBALE. 
The Afghan Knife. 

By R. liOUIS STEVENSON. 
New Arabian Nights. | Prince Otto. 

By BERTHA THOITIAS. 
Cressida. I The Violin-Player. 

Proud Maisie. | 

By AVAI.TER THORNBURV. 
Tales for the Marines. | Old Stories Retold. 
T. AB01.PHUS TROl^l^OPE. 
Diamond Cut Diamond. 

By F. ELEANOR TROI.I.OPE. 
Like Ships upon the I Anne Furness. 
Sea. I Mabels Progress. 

By ANTHONY TROl.liOPE. 



The American Senator. 
Mr. Scarborough 8 

Family. 
The Golden Lion of 

Granpere. 



Frau Frohmann 
Marion Fay. 
Kept in the Dark. 
John Caldigate. 
The Way We Live Now. 
The Land-Leaguers. 

By S. T. TRO^VBRIBOE. 
Farnell's Folly. 

By IVAN TUROENIEFF, &c 
Stories from Foreign Novelists. 

By MARK TWAIN 



A Pleasure Trip on the 

Continent. 
The Gilded Age. 
Huckleberry Finn. 
MarkTwain s Sketches. 
Tom Sawyer. 
A Tramp Abroad. 
Stolen White Elephant. 

By C. C. FRASER-TYTIiEit 
Mistress Judith. 

By SARAH TYTI.ER 



Life on the Mississippi. 

The Prince and the 
Pauper. 

A Yankee at the Court 
of King Arthur. 

The L£1,000,000 Bank- 
note. 



The Huguenot Family. 
The Blackball Ghosts. 
What SheCameThrough 
Beauty and the Beast. 
Citoyenne Jaqueline. 



The Bride s Pass. 

Buried Diamonds, 

St. Mungo s City. 

Lady Bell. 

Noblesse Oblige. 

Disappeared. 

By A¥.I>EN UPVVARB. 

The Queen against Owen. 

By AARON WATSON nitil 
L,Il,L,IAS ^VASSERTIANN. 

The Marquis of Carabas. 

By Wlf^LiIAilI AVESTAIil.. 

Trust-Money. 

By iUix. F. II. ^VII.CIAiflSON. 

A ChUd Widow. 

By J. S. ^VINTER. 

Cavalry Life. | Regimental Legends. 

By H. F. W 00». 

The Passenger from Scotland Yard. 

The Englishman of the Rue Cain. 

By I.ady WOOB, 

Sabina. 

CEL.IA PARKER TVOOIiL.Elf, 

Rachel Armstrong ; or, Love and Theology. 
By EBITIUNB YATES. 

The Forlorn Hope. 1 Castaway. 

Land at Last. | 



OGDEN, SMALE AND CO. LIMITED, PRINTE-RS, GRKAT SAFFKON HILL, B.C» 



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